1490940391 <![CDATA[Urban Universities for HEALTH News Stories]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news en jmichaels@aplu.org Copyright 2017 2017-03-28T09:00:00+00:00 <![CDATA[Join us for APLU’s INCLUDES Summit next month]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news#When:09:00:00Z From the National Program Office

Institutional leaders and their teams are invited to attend APLU’s 2017 INCLUDES Summit, which will be held April 25-26 at the Embassy Suites Old Town, Alexandria, VA.  The event will bring together institutional leaders, along with content and context experts, for an interactive summit on broadening the participation of women and underrepresented minorities within STEM faculty and students. This APLU sponsored summit is funded by the National Science Foundation and has no registration fee, however, space for the summit is limited and the hotel block closes on April 3rd. Click here to register. For questions, please contact includes@aplu.org.   

Join us for our next webinar in the Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce webinar series: “Supporting Minority Postdocs” on Tuesday, April 18, 1:00-2:00pm Eastern Time. Click here to register.  A critical transition point for entry into the professoriate is a post-doctoral experience. In the STEM and biomedical science fields, one or more years of work as a post-doc are increasingly required for advancement into tenure-track faculty positions, but according to recent NSF data only 4 percent of post-doctoral scholars in those fields were from underrepresented backgrounds. Furthermore, underrepresented post-docs are not entering tenure-track faculty positions in sufficient numbers, especially at research-intensive institutions. This webinar will explore known barriers to minority post-doc success, and highlight programs designed to advance minority post-docs to the professoriate, including the national NIH IRACDA program and the regional Carolina Postdoctoral Program for Faculty Diversity.

News

Cleveland State University, University Hospitals, and Cuyahoga Community College have joined forces to address the looming nursing shortage in Northeast Ohio by increasing the number of bachelor’s educated nurses. The collaborative effort uses tuition support, enhanced advising, and work opportunities to increase the number of graduates from CSU’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing program – with a goal of a 40 percent increase by 2020.

The California State University system is transforming developmental education to help retain and graduate more at-risk students. Instead of non-credit remedial courses, which often frustrate new students and lead to dropouts, at-risk students will be enrolled in “stretch” courses that both provide remedial content and credits that can be used toward a degree.

Google and Howard University are teaming up to create “Howard West,” a new HBCU outpost on Google’s Mountain View campus that aims to increase the number of black students who go on to a career with Google.  Students will get three months of computer science classes, one-on-one mentorships, and other Google perks. Tuition will be paid for by Howard and private donors; funding will also cover their housing and a summer stipend.

Tracking where students go after graduation has always been difficult, but some institutions are doing it better than others. An article in the Hechinger Report exposes the “alternative facts” surrounding job placement rates, and how universities can provide applicants with a better depiction of what to expect.

Opinion

AAMC’s Darrell Kirch and Kate Patelle have published a Viewpoint in JAMA on the looming physician shortage and how that shortage is influenced by demographic changes. The authors argue that we must create better practice models, foster a culture of interprofessional team-based care, and develop a diverse health care workforce that “serves all individuals in the United States.”
 

Upcoming Events

On June 24-25, the Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative (SMTI) and the Accelerating Systemic Change Network (ASCN) will hold a joint meeting following the Network of STEM Education Centers National Conference in New Orleans, LA. The theme of this meeting is embedding diversity and inclusion into efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education. Participants will engage in addressing problems of practice, as well as how to close the loop between researchers and change agents.
 

Publications and Resources

An article in the most recent issue of PNAS provides new evidence that gender diversity does, indeed, lead to better science.

Is our national debate on health care reform focusing on the right issues? A meta-analysis of 19 National Academy of Medicine-commissioned white papers suggests that we are not. In order to address the most salient health challenges facing the United States, the authors argue that we must focus on four action priorities (paying for value, empowering people, activating communities, and connecting care) as well as expanding essential infrastructure for effective care delivery.

 

 

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2017-03-28T09:00:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Funding opportunities, news, and more in February’s Learning Collaborative update!]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news#When:12:23:00Z From the NPO

Urban Universities for HEALTH is nearing the finish line, with the final menu of metrics and dashboard expected later this spring. In the meantime, please join the USU/APLU and AAC&U for an upcoming webinar on Tracking Student Access to High-Impact Practices in STEM, Wednesday, March 8, from 1:00-2:00 pm Eastern Time. Register Here.

 

Funding Opportunities

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is accepting applications for its Clinical Scholars program, a three-year leadership program for clinically active healthcare providers and practitioners. The total award to the grantee organization will be up to $105,000 per team member (teams may comprise 2-5 individuals) for the three-year program. The deadline is March 8, 2017. RWJF is also accepting applications for Interdisciplinary Research Leaders (deadline March 8, 2017, maximum award $350,000 per grantee organization), and Health Policy Research Scholars (deadline March 29, 2017, annual stipend of $30,000/year for four years).  

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is accepting applications for Partnerships to Achieve Health Equity. Projects must demonstrate regional or nationwide impact. The deadline is March 31, 2017. Awards will range from $325,000-$400,000.

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) is accepting applications for its Engagement Awards program, with a focus on knowledge, training, development, and dissemination. These awards support projects that encourage active integration of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders as integral members of the patient-centered outcomes research/clinical effectiveness research enterprise. Letters of Intent are due June 1, 2017, with full proposals due 40 days after approval of the LOI. Support is capped at $250,000 for up to 2 years.

The AAMC’s Herbert W. Nickens Award is given to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to promoting justice in medical education and health care equity in the United States.  The awardee receives the Nickens Award and a $10,000 prize, and will present the Nickens Lecture at Learn Serve Lead 2017 in Boston. Completed nomination package should be emailed in a single file, with the nomination letter first, to Angela Moses at NickensAwards@aamc.org by April 7, 2017.

 

News

The U.S. is running out of nurses, according to an article in The Atlantic earlier this month. Our aging population, rising rates of chronic illness, and limited capacity of nursing schools has pushed the nursing shortage to near crisis levels, “with worrying implications for patients and healthcare providers alike.”

Our Learning Collaborative colleagues Greer Glazer and Karen Bankston from the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing have authored an article for the Sullivan Alliance blog on how nurse practitioners can transform primary care. Nurse practitioners are more likely than other primary care disciplines to practice in underserved rural and urban communities. They also play a key role in reducing health care costs: the article states that greater use of NPs and other advanced practice nurses would save $16 billion a year (and up to $166 billion if NPs manage nursing home residents). Learn more.

Universities continue to leverage new technology and the power of big data to support student success and degree completion. Georgia State University’s Graduation and Progression Success (GPS) system looks at 800 different triggers to identify potential at-risk students and alert advisors before those students begin to struggle.  Also, an interview with Timothy McKay, who heads the University of Michigan’s Digital Innovation Greenhouse, takes a deep dive into learning analytics and how the field is transforming.

Morgan State University has received a $700,000 grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education its efforts to increase graduation rates for historically underserved students.

A few leadership updates: The University of Cincinnati taps Neville Pinto to be its 30th president. Francis Collins will stay on as Director of the National Institutes of Health.

 

Opinion

Why is it so hard to close the racial health gap in the U.S.? Equalizing access is not enough: we need to eliminate structural and societal barriers.

Claire Pomeroy, President of the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation, argues in the Huffington Post that both health care spending and medical research must address the social determinants of health.

 

Upcoming Events

Join the Health Equity Leadership and Exchange Network (HELEN) for an upcoming webinar entitled The Continuing Struggle for Health Equity: A Look at the Challenges and Opportunities for Health Reform and Health Equity in 2017 and Beyond. The webinar will be held Wednesday, February 22, from 3:00-4:00pm Eastern Time.

The AAMC will host a webinar, Parallel Crises: The Over and Under Prescription of Opioids, on Monday, February 27, 12:00pm Eastern Time. Also from the AAMC: unconscious bias training for health professionals, coming up April 11 in Nashville, TN and April 17 in Boston, MA.

Improving Outcomes: Transformative Change in LGBTQ+ Healthcare is a leadership summit sponsored by the UC Davis Office for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. The summit will take place Saturday, March 25, in Sacramento, CA.

The UT Health Science Center’s School of Nursing will host its 4th annual Cultural Inclusion Institute on April 26-27 in San Antonio, TX. This year’s theme is Linking Social Determinants of Health to Health Disparities and Cultural Inclusion. Primary care providers, nurses, social workers, dentists, educators, researchers, community-based non-profits, and students are invited to attend.

 

Publications and Resources

The AAMC has published Diversity in Medical Education: Facts & Figures 2016, which provides an overview of detailed statistical information on race, ethnicity, and gender patterns in U.S. medical education for the 2014–2015 academic year, along with nearly ten years of data on select topics. 

Our Learning Partners Network colleagues from Wayne State University, Ambika Mathur and Andrew Feig, have co-authored a new article in Change magazine: Using Longitudinal Data on Career Outcomes to Promote Improvements and Diversity in Graduate Education.

The Health and Medicine division of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine has published a report: Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity. The report summarizes the findings of an expert committee that considered solutions that could be implemented at the local or community level to advance health equity.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Healthcare: A Clinical Guide to Preventive, Primary, and Specialist Care, fulfills the unmet need for a clinically focused guide to LGBT preventive and specialty medicine.

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.

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2017-02-14T12:23:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Addressing Unconscious Bias in Higher Education]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news#When:22:55:00Z Providing unconscious bias training to faculty and staff may reduce discrimination and mitigate the impact of bias at the university. Although evidence-based training models exist, effective implementation of those models is critical. Some universities have found that mandatory training can incite backlash, while voluntary training is unlikely to reach those who need it most. In addition, not all biases can be addressed at once; separate trainings are needed for racial bias, gender bias, disability bias, etc.

This webinar, co-hosted by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), is part of a series intended to stimulate discussion and engage university leaders around topics from the recent report Increasing Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce: Actions for Improving Evidence, supported by the National Institutes of Health. During this webinar, experts on unconscious bias training will share evidence from their research, describe effective models, and discuss challenges for implementation. The speakers will also discuss remaining research gaps that limit the applicability of unconscious bias interventions across different contexts (e.g., admissions) and next steps for expanding the use of this promising practice.

The webinar will be held on Friday, January 13, 2017, 12:00-1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Click here to register.

Speakers include:  

  • Laura Castillo-Page, Ph.D., Acting Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer and Senior Director, Diversity Policies and Programs, Association of American Medical Colleges
  • Brian Gibbs, Ph.D., MPA, Vice President, Equity & Inclusion, Oregon Health and Science University
  • Janetta Lun, Ph.D., Senior Behavioral Scientist, National Institutes of Health
  • Janice Sabin, Ph.D., MSW, Research Associate Professor, University of Washington Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education

Who should attend this webinar? Anyone interested in exploring unconscious/implicit bias training, particularly as a strategy to diversify the STEM and biomedical science workforce. Interested individuals may include university leaders and administrators, deans, chairs of faculty search committees and admissions committees, diversity professionals, and faculty.

Register today

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2016-11-29T22:55:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Holistic Review in Graduate Admissions: What We Need to Know]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news#When:18:10:00Z The pathway to becoming a scientist leads through graduate school, and graduate admissions committees are the gatekeepers. How they choose to evaluate applicants to their programs impacts the development of the future research workforce. Holistic review is a university admissions strategy that assesses an applicant’s unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores. Robust evidence supports the use of holistic review in undergraduate admissions and in the health professions, but the extent to which graduate programs are using the practice – and how they are using it – is less well-known.

This webinar, co-hosted by the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS), the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), is part of a series intended to stimulate discussion and engage university leaders around topics from the recent report Increasing Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce: Actions for Improving Evidence, supported by the NIH. The webinar will explore existing evidence for the promising practice of holistic review and critical gaps in evidence that need to be addressed. Speakers will discuss the challenges associated with holistic review in graduate admissions, with a particular focus on STEM and the biomedical sciences where scholars from diverse backgrounds are underrepresented. The webinar will close with information about a proposed action item to pilot holistic review in STEM and biomedical science graduate programs.

Speakers include:  

  • Courtney Ferrell Aklin, Ph.D., Chief of Staff, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD).
  • Julia Kent, Ph.D., Assistant Vice President for Communications, Advancement and Best Practices at the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS).
  • Ambika Mathur, Ph.D., Associate Provost for Scientific Workforce Training, Development and Diversity, and Dean of the Graduate School at Wayne State University.
  • Keivan G. Stassun, Ph.D., Stevenson Endowed Professor of Physics & Astronomy and Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Research at Vanderbilt University.

Who should attend this webinar? Anyone interested in exploring holistic review as an evidence-based strategy to diversify the STEM and biomedical science workforce including, but not limited to, university leaders and administrators, deans, chairs of admissions committees, faculty, and diversity professionals.

Watch the video recording:

 

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2016-10-28T18:10:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Four UU-HEALTH Demonstration Sites Honored for Diversity Efforts]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news#When:18:36:00Z From the National Program Office

Congratulations to the four UU-HEALTH demonstration sites that have recently been awarded the Insight into Diversity 2016 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) award for health professions schools! The University of Cincinnati, University of Missouri-Kansas City, University of New Mexico, and SUNY Downstate were recognized for their substantial contributions to diversity in higher education.

The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center reported that it has dramatically increased faculty diversity after completing a two-year pilot of a new mentoring program, Advancing Institutional Mentoring Excellence (AIME). Twenty-seven percent of all faculty in the School of Medicine are faculty of color, compared to only 16 percent in 2002. The effort is linked to UNM’s Vision 2020 goal to help New Mexico make more progress toward health and health equity than any other state.

SUNY Downstate and the SUNY University at Albany have jointly received a Best of New York award for their collaboration tool designed to share health-disparities research and scholarship between the two institutions. The Health Disparities and Inequalities Collaboration Platform (HDIC) enables faculty, researchers, and clinicians at Downstate and UAlbany to communicate, access real-time information, and share ideas and resources.

University of Cincinnati College of Nursing Dean and UU-HEALTH Co-PI Dr. Greer Glazer has joined the Board of Directors of The Sullivan Alliance to Transform the Health Professions. According to Sullivan Alliance chairman and CEO Louis Sullivan, “Dr. Glazer’s strong leadership skills and deep engagement in diversity efforts will be a tremendous asset to our efforts to increase diversity across the health workforce.”

 

Funding Opportunities

AAMC has called for applications from member institutions to participate in a series of workshops focused on building a systems approach to community health and health equity. Applications are due on October 28.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is now accepting applications for its Health Policy Fellows program for 2017-2018. Up to six awards of up to $165,000 will be made to exceptional midcareer health professionals and behavioral and social scientists with an interest in health and health care policy. The deadline to apply is November 15.

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has announced the Hanna H. Gray Fellows Program for early career scientists from groups underrepresented in the life sciences. Each fellow will receive funding for up to eight years, with mentoring and active involvement within the HHMI community. The deadline to apply is February 15, 2017.

The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR) and the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) announced a small grant program to develop problem-based case studies aimed at deepening health professions students’ understanding of the significance of social determinants of health (SDOH) and how to incorporate information and insights about SDOH into their work. Four awards of up to $6,000 each will be awarded to faculty or faculty teams to develop a case study with a learner assessment and facilitator guide. Applications are due October 25.

 

News

A new analysis published in Nature shows that the field of personalized medicine may be leaving minority populations behind – and missing out on a significant portion of the world’s genetic variation. Data from the U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute shows that less than 4% of samples come from “individuals of African and Latin American ancestry, Hispanic people (individuals descended from Spanish-speaking cultures in central or South America living in the United States) and native or indigenous peoples.

The NIMHD has formally designated sexual and gender minorities (SGM) as a health disparities population for research purposes. Abundant evidence demonstrates that these populations have less access to health care, receive poorer quality care, have lower life expectancies, and disproportionately suffer from certain diseases.  In addition, a recent study found that nearly 40 percent of transgender Americans have experienced discrimination by health care providers in clinical settings.

Despite new evidence that students feel more motivated and supported by faculty of color, diversity in the professoriate continues to be a challenge for many universities.  Marybeth Gasman, director of the Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions, published a compelling essay in the Washington Post about why colleges don’t hire more faculty of color: they simply don’t have the will to do what works. Read her essay, and the responses to it.

The higher education community continues to discuss various interventions for improving student success. The University of Maryland Baltimore County is rolling out a new data analytics program designed to synthesize information about persistence, completion, and graduation across the institution. An essay in Inside Higher Ed argues that institutions need to do more to foster three experiences that shape students’ motivation to stay in college: self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and perceived value of the curriculum. Finally, cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham (University of Virginia) proposes similar interventions but adds that students must be taught time-management and study skills as early as possible – preferably during their K-12 years.

 

Upcoming Events

17th Annual UCLA Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Equity Symposium, November 2 in Los Angeles, CA

Learn, Serve, Lead 2016: The AAMC Annual Meeting, November 11-15 in Seattle, WA

2016 APLU Annual Meeting, November 13-15 in Austin, TX

 

Publications and Resources

A new toolkit series from the Democracy Collaborative, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is designed to help hospitals and health systems build community wealth through inclusive hiring, investment, and purchasing. The first toolkit in this series is Inclusive, Local Hiring: how hospitals and health systems can create jobs and careers for local communities. Subsequent installments on purchasing and investment will be released later in 2016.

Two new National Academies of Sciences (NAS) reports have been published. Exploring the Role of Accreditation in Enhancing Quality and Innovation in Health Professions Education summarizes the proceedings of a Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education workshop. This workshop aimed to explore global shifts in society, health, health care, and education, and their potential effects on general principles of program accreditation across the continuum of health professional education.

The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy examines successes and future opportunities for public-private partnerships to further health equity. The report identifies three areas where the private sector has potential for impact: fostering economic opportunity (including workforce development), creating healthy work and community environments, and improving employee health.

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.

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2016-10-18T18:36:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Learning Collaborative Update: Funding Opportunities, News, and Events]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news#When:16:30:00Z From the National Program Office

Two years ago, Urban Universities for HEALTH published a landmark study on the use of holistic review in the health professions. Holistic review is an evidence-based strategy that assesses an applicant’s unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores. The practice is widespread in medicine and dentistry, but less than half of nursing schools participating in the study said they used holistic review.

To address this gap, UU-HEALTH collaborated with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to develop tools and training for nursing deans to support implementation of holistic review on their campuses. We are pleased to announce the launch of an online knowledge base of resources for holistic review in nursing. The knowledge base is hosted on the AACN website and contains co-designed resources including sample essay questions and screening rubrics, legal guidelines, best practices, and case studies.  Please feel free to use the knowledge base and share it with your colleagues.

Funding Opportunities

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) at NIH is soliciting grant applications to support efforts to provide health information to health disparity populations and their health care providers. Letters of intent are due November 16, with a full proposal due December 16.

The Kresge Foundation is accepting proposals for Innovative Public Health Programs and Policies. The Foundation encourages proposals that employ new methods of shared accountability for improving population health, and that share and use data from multiple sectors to inform strategies, measure progress and refine interventions. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

The NIH has released a number of FOAs related to health disparities including: Behavioral and Social Science Research on Understanding and Reducing Health Disparities (R01), NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Enhancing Diversity in Biomedical Data Science (R25), and the Mentored Research Scientist Development Award to Promote Diversity (K01), (K08), and (K23).

News

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) announced last month that it will launch two transdisciplinary collaborative centers to study and address the impact of social determinants of health on health disparities. In a statement, the director of the NIMHD, Dr. Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, said that “multilevel interventions that take into account complex interactions between individuals and their environments can better address determinants of health and enhance chronic disease prevention and health promotion for local communities.”

Dr. Erik Porfeli from Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) was quoted in an article on the growing number of health professions graduates who choose to remain in the area, bolstering the health care workforce in local communities. The university’s successful pipeline programs have expanded the number of local students who enter health careers, and approximately 50 percent of NEOMED graduates stay and practice in state.

The University of New Mexico reports that it awarded a record number of degrees last year despite declining enrollment, with its four-year graduation rate exceeding 20 percent for the first time in years. The university attributes its success to changes in credit requirements, engagement of faculty in student success, and increased investment in student services.

Campus climate has taken center stage in higher education news this month, primarily in response to the University of Chicago’s letter to new students warning them not to expect safe spaces or trigger warnings.  While some university leaders applauded the University of Chicago’s alleged commitment to free speech, others questioned the wisdom of such a decision in the wake of student protests and demands for a more inclusive climate. Some example approaches for making campus climate more inclusive included setting a diversity agenda at the highest levels of leadership, and integrating diversity training across the curriculum (as opposed to holding “one-off” trainings during orientation).

Greer Glazer, PhD, dean of the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, has been named one of the 30 Most Influential Deans of Nursing in the United States. Former University of Cincinnati president Santa J. Ono, now president of the University of British Columbia, was named as a recipient of the 2016 National Association of Asian American Professionals award.

Opinion

Valerie Pierre, a fourth-year medical student at Howard University, authored a perspective piece for Urban University on using holistic review in admissions to build a diverse and prepared health care workforce.

APLU President Peter McPherson penned an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times urging university leaders to renew their focus on degree completion as a measure of institutional success.

Upcoming Events

Join the AAMC’s Advancing Holistic Review Initiative on Thursday, September 8, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Eastern Time for a free webinar on data-driven admissions. Experts will illustrate the link between admissions and institutional mission, and demonstrate how medical schools are using data to continually inform and improve their admissions process.

The National Collaborative for Health Equity is sponsoring a two-part webinar series called “Beyond Bias.” Part 1, to be held on Thursday, September 8, 2:00-3:30 p.m. Eastern Time, will examine the science of implicit bias. Part 2, to be held on Thursday, September 15, 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time, will discuss strategies for reducing implicit bias and stereotype threat.

The AAMC Research on Care Community Health Equity (ROCChe) subgroup will host a webinar on Tuesday, September 14, 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time to highlight efforts by the NIH to increase diversity within the biomedical research workforce. Jamboor Vishwanatha, PhD, University of North Texas Health Science Center, and Keith Norris, MD, PhD, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, will discuss the work of the BUILD (Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity) initiative and the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN).

The AAMC and APLU annual meetings will be held on the same weekend this year, so you may have to choose which one to attend – or plan your travel carefully! The AAMC’s Learn Serve Lead 2016 will be held in Seattle, WA on November 11-15, and the APLU Annual Meeting will be held in Austin, TX on November 13-15.

Publications and Resources

Increasing Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce: Actions for Improving Evidence examines university diversity strategies and proposes research actions for improving the quality of evidence to support effective practices –and help university leaders eliminate practices that don’t work well. The APLU-USU-AAMC joint publication was developed by an interdisciplinary team of 70 research experts at 28 universities, and was supported by the NIH Office of Scientific Workforce Diversity.

The Chronicle of Higher Education’s interactive website Where Does Your Freshman Class Come From is a useful and easy-to-navigate resource for institutions seeking to attract more local students.

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.

 

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2016-09-06T16:30:00+00:00
<![CDATA[University Groups Recommend Actions for Improving Diversity in Nation’s Research Workforce]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news#When:17:33:00Z Washington, D.C.— To help university leaders address a lack of underrepresented minority scholars in the nation’s scientific workforce, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU), and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) today released a report proposing specific actions that would put vital evidence at their fingertips.

The report, Increasing Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce: Actions for Improving Evidence, notes that although many universities are undertaking initiatives to diversify talent, promising innovations may benefit from broader testing. Targeting key research gaps will contribute to a stronger evidence base for successful interventions, enabling universities to bring these strategies to scale and magnify their impact. Ultimately, having more rigorous scientific evidence will drive changes in the way universities do business, increasing investment in practices that work and phasing out those that do not.

APLU, USU and the AAMC collaborated on the report to develop a set of research actions for their networks of member institutions. All of the actions are focused on improving evidence for university strategies intended to diversify the scientific workforce. The proposed actions include pilot projects to test promising interventions, cross-institutional studies, and analysis of national datasets.

Some recommendations from the report include:

  • Adapt and pilot interventions for reducing stereotype threat, which have demonstrated success at the undergraduate level, for graduate students in STEM fields;
  • Evaluate the feasibility of using holistic review, an admissions strategy supported by data from the health professions, in doctoral program admissions in STEM fields; and
  • Examine the impact of programs designed to facilitate the transition of underrepresented graduate students into postdoctoral opportunities and, ultimately, the professoriate.

“This report is a key tool for institutions that are working to measure and bolster their diversity — and it will prove invaluable as they work to refine programs aiming to achieve such broad diversity,” said APLU President McPherson. “By strengthening evidence, it lays a solid foundation for building diverse campuses and, just important, a diverse scientific workforce.”

Diversity in the biomedical workforce is critical for conducting quality research that will enhance the nation’s competitiveness and result in equitable health outcomes. Studies across several disciplines have demonstrated that diverse teams are able to solve complex problems more quickly and effectively than homogenous ones. In health and biomedicine, a diverse workforce helps produce treatments and cures that are applicable to all patient populations while also enhancing patient satisfaction and trust.

Yet the current dearth of diversity in the scientific workforce limits the efficacy of research and treatment. According to recent data, only 8.5 percent of doctoral degrees were awarded to underrepresented individuals, and only 4 percent of postdoctoral scholars in STEM fields were from underrepresented groups. The lack of minority representation is concerning, especially since the United States is expected to become a majority-minority nation within the next few decades.

The working groups that produced the report were comprised of more than 70 experts across 28 universities and collectively developed the recommended actions for improving evidence. Members of the groups were nominated by their university presidents and chancellors, and included leaders of the institution’s research enterprise as well as content experts in areas such as organizational change, talent development, and recruitment.

The groups of experts reviewed existing evidence, validated the evidence through interviews with researchers in the field, and identified high-priority gaps in knowledge to address.

"We knew we couldn't address every gap, but there were certain areas of low-hanging fruit where we felt targeted research across our universities could make a big difference," said Caroline Whitacre, Senior Vice President for Research at The Ohio State University, who chaired one of the working groups on Leadership, Organizational Change, and Climate. "For example, many institutions are conducting some type of 'diversity training' but does it really work? How do we know which elements or delivery models are most effective? We need to be capturing these data."

Once these key research gaps were identified the groups developed actions for improving scientific evidence – multi-institution studies, pilot projects to test promising interventions more broadly, or other large-scale collaborations – which were further prioritized by presidents and chancellors at the APLU Annual Meeting in November 2015.

Support for the project was provided by the office of the Chief Officer for Scientific Workforce Diversity (COSWD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

This press release was originally posted by APLU on July 28, 2016.

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The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) is a research, policy, and advocacy organization representing 236 public research universities, land-grant institutions, state university systems, and affiliated organizations.  Founded in 1887, APLU is North America's oldest higher education association with member institutions in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, four U.S. territories, Canada, and Mexico. Annually, member campuses enroll 4.7 million undergraduates and 1.3 million graduate students, award 1.2 million degrees, employ 1.2 million faculty and staff, and conduct $42.7 billion in university-based research.

The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) is a president-led organization committed to escalating urban university engagement to increase prosperity and opportunity in the nation’s cities, and to tackling key urban challenges. The USU includes 35 public urban research universities representing all U.S. geographic regions. The USU agenda focuses on creating a competitive workforce, building strong communities, and improving the health of a diverse population. The USU has partnered with the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) to establish an Office of Urban Initiatives, housed at APLU, to jointly lead an urban agenda for the nation’s public universities.

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2016-07-28T17:33:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Learning Collaborative report highlighted in Trusteeship magazine]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-report-highlighted-in-trusteeship-magazine-and-other http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-report-highlighted-in-trusteeship-magazine-and-other#When:15:13:00Z From the National Program Office


As the Urban Universities for HEALTH initiative winds to a close, we are focused on disseminating the results of our work broadly and deepening the impact of our research related to health workforce diversity and health disparities. The Urban Universities for HEALTH report on holistic admissions was cited in the cover story for the most recent issue of Trusteeship magazine. University of Cincinnati President Santa J. Ono, who is a strong supporter of Urban Universities for HEALTH efforts, writes that “it is crucial that we conduct an equitable, transparent, and mission-based admissions process that will result in the enrollment of a diverse class of students with the attributes needed for success in academia and beyond.”
 

Funding Opportunities and Awards


The National Institutes of Health has announced a new round of funding for the Mentored Research Scientist Development Award (Parent K01). The purpose of this award is to provide support and protected time for an intensive career development experience in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical sciences. Standard dates apply, with the first due date occurring on June 12, 2016.

The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation Award for Excellence in Social Mission in Health Professions Education recognizes outstanding leadership in imbuing the social mission into health professions education. Awards will be given in three categories: individual, program, and institution, and come with a $2,000 honorarium. The deadline for nominations is June 17, 2016.

The AAMC Innovations in Research Education Award highlights innovation in PhD, MD-PhD, and postdoctoral education and training that enhances the institutional research mission. Examples include curricular reform, improved learning methods, and new research career pathways. Up to a $5,000 prize for each winning entry will be awarded. Applications are due June 20, 2016.

The National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education has issued a call for proposals from nursing schools for efforts designed to accelerate the development of creative and sustainable interprofessional initiatives in which graduate nursing and one or more other professions actively learn and work together in community-based clinical settings.  Up to $50,000 will be awarded for 2-year initiatives. Proposals are due July 15, 2016.
 

News


Diversity and inclusion issues continued to take center stage in the media this past month. The Chronicle of Higher Education released a special diversity report with articles on setting a diversity agenda and assessing commitment to diversity, among other topics. The special report also included commentary authored by Gary Butts, Dean of Diversity Programs and Policy at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine, on diversity in medical schools.

As campus protests continue, administrators have begun to acknowledge the need for systemic change and a collaborative approach to decision-making that will address the needs of all students. Michelle Asha Cooper, president of the Institute for Higher Education Policy, writes in EducationDIVE that because of the changing demographics of students, “policies and practices and norms that were prevalent 20 years ago and still in place are outdated.” A proactive approach that incorporates regular data collection (including campus climate assessments) and realistic promises will help administrators navigate the change process more effectively.

An article in The Hechinger Report tells the story of how a small liberal arts college was able to move beyond diversification to achieve broader culture change on campus. The college encouraged different groups to work together by setting aside a funding pool for ideas that would improve integration of students from diverse backgrounds and foster open communication.

Rutgers University-Newark took holistic admissions a step further by aggressively recruiting low-income, urban, public high school graduates with mediocre test scores – most of whom are considered “at risk” by other colleges. By combining this recruitment approach with enhanced course offerings, improved student services, and additional financial supports, the University has achieved a graduation rate for underrepresented minority students that is well above the national average.
 

Upcoming Events


On Tuesday, June 7, from 1:30-4:00 p.m. EDT the UNC Gillings School of Public Health will hold their 22nd National Health Equity Research Webcast, focusing on political power, policy, and health equity. The webcast will feature a moderated panel of nationally recognized researchers and practitioners.

The Beyond Flexner conference is a comprehensive conference for health professionals committed to more equitable health care, and will be held September 19-21 in Miami, FL. Open to professionals, residents, and students, the event will feature compelling lectures, focused breakout sessions and interactive discussion panels with key opinion leaders in the field of public health.

The Healthcare Quality and Equity Action Forum, convened by The Disparities Solution Center, will be held September 29-30 in Boston, MA. The theme this year is “Moving Towards Access and Accountability. Register here.

The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) will hold its Fall Institute on October 5-7 in Herndon, VA. The purpose of the institute is to provide post-baccalaureate health professions faculty and their IPE colleagues quality time and dedicated space for guided learning, team-based planning activities, and consultation with experts and peers.

 

Publications and Resources


A special supplement of the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice is focused entirely on health equity. Articles explore various policy solutions, collaborative and community-based approaches, and methods for measuring health equity outcomes.

AAMC has published several new resources, including Achieving Health Equity: How Academic Medicine is Addressing the Social Determinants of Health, and a report on physician supply and demand projections through 2025.

A new report from the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) presents results from a recent national survey on health center clinical workforce needs and priorities. The report is entitled Staffing the Safety Net: Building the Primary Care Workforce at America’s Health Centers.

An article in Nursing Education Perspectives shares outcomes from a collaborative project to recruit and retain students from underrepresented and disadvantaged backgrounds into nursing. Interventions included a pre-professional education program for high school students and retention programs for enrolled students; outcomes included increased enrollment, graduation rates, and NCLEX success. 

 

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2016-06-02T15:13:00+00:00
<![CDATA[News and updates from the UU-HEALTH Learning Collaborative]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/news-and-updates-from-the-uu-health-learning-collaborative http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/news-and-updates-from-the-uu-health-learning-collaborative#When:14:13:00Z From the National Program Office

We are continuing to track the dissemination of our work and publications throughout the media. Our study on holistic review was cited by the American Medical Association in an article on diversity in medical education. Inside Higher Ed cited our study on faculty cluster hiring as a potential source of guidance in their examination of UC Riverside’s struggling cluster initiative, as did the Chronicle of Higher Education in a similar article. Check out the Publications section of our website for access to the original reports!

USU/APLU and seven public research universities recently launched a new, large-scale collaborative effort to accelerate implementation of innovative student success practices. The new initiative, Collaborating for Change, is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and aims to help universities support high-needs and traditionally at-risk students while keeping costs down, re-examining business models, and reaching deeper into local communities.

The University of Cincinnati plans to invest more than $40 million to build and sustain their faculty diversity initiatives. The Strategic Hiring Opportunity Program, Dual Career Assistance Program, and the Cluster Hiring Program have brought more than two dozen new underrepresented minority faculty members into the university community. UC plans to continue these successes with the commitment of new funds. In other news, UC’s President Santa J. Ono recently received a diversity leadership award from the American Council on Education (ACE).

SUNY Downstate Medical Center recently held one of the largest college and career fairs ever in New York City devoted solely to STEM subjects: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Students from 20 high schools and 10 middle schools in Brooklyn attended the event.

 

Funding Opportunities

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation recently launched a set of funding opportunities for Health Policy Research Scholars, Clinical Scholars, Health Leaders, and Interdisciplinary Research Leaders. The Foundation held an informational webinar for applicants for all four programs; the recording can be found here. The deadline for receipt of applications is April 19.

Also from RWJF: The Foundation is looking for projects, programs, and models that promote health equity and are aligned with their Culture of Health Action Framework, particularly those approaches that have demonstrated impact but have not been widely tested or implemented in the U.S. Up to $250,000 per grantee is available for up to 18 months. Read more and apply here – the deadline is May 31.

Your nursing students may be interested in HRSA’s NURSE Corps Scholarship Program, which provides scholarships to current nursing students in exchange for two years of service at a health care facility with a critical shortage of nurses. Scholarships cover tuition and fees as well as a monthly support stipend. The deadline to apply is May 5.

 

News

An article in Health Affairs explores how hospitals are engaging in community health. Even relatively small investments have been successfully used to impact population health outcomes through the creation of new housing, healthy food, and education programs in underserved communities.

A number of media outlets, including the Atlantic and the Chronicle of Higher Education have covered the results of ACE’s recent survey of university presidents on campus racial climate.  The survey found that presidents have been meeting with student organizers, elevating racial diversity on their list of priorities, and working with student affairs officials to improve racial diversity. On a related note, the University of Missouri system recently hired a new Chief Diversity Officer, Kevin McDonald, who will tackle the challenge of setting a new diversity agenda at institutions facing widespread criticism from students.

More than 50 schools have succeeded in reducing the graduation gap between black and white students. A new report covered by the Atlantic describes their efforts and outlines strategies that -- if brought to scale -- may help other institutions do the same.  

Florida International University president Mark Rosenberg recently announced that he and his wife will donate more than $1 million to support scholarships targeted toward first-generation college students.

 

Upcoming Events

April is National Minority Health Month! Learn more about how to promote minority health and raise awareness at the HHS Office of Minority Health’s website, Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation.

The 2016 LGBT Health Workforce Conference will take place April 28-30 at Hunter College in New York, NY.

The AAMC Mid-Career Minority Faculty Seminar will be held June 23-25 at the AAMC Learning Center in Washington, DC. This leadership program is designed specifically for individuals at the associate professor level who aspire to leadership positions in academic medicine. Applications are due May 2.

Save the date for the 2016 USU Summer Meeting June 27-28 in Portland, OR. Details are forthcoming.

 

Publications and Resources

The Institute of Medicine has released two new publications of relevance to our Learning Collaborative: A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health, and Metrics that Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Office of Minority Health recently released the Mapping Medicare Disparities (MMD) Tool. This interactive mapping tool is designed to help policymakers and practitioners evaluate geographic, racial and ethnic differences in health outcomes.

The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) released a new report, Foiling the Drop Out Trap, which shares innovative completion grant practices designed to help universities retain and graduate more students.

Do free clinic experiences enhance medical students’ commitment to underserved areas? The answer is “yes” – check out AAMC’s Analysis in Brief to find out why. The AAMC also released a new projection of the physician shortage that takes into account existing inequities in health care utilization.

Grantmakers in Health and the Aetna Foundation supported a special supplement to the Stanford Social Innovation Review entitled: Innovations in Health Equity. The supplement contains a collection of articles on new innovations in the field authored by community, public health, and foundation leaders.

 

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.

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2016-04-13T14:13:00+00:00
<![CDATA[A new year of collaboration: fresh resources, updates, and opportunities from UU-HEALTH]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/a-new-year-of-collaboration-fresh-resources-updates-and-opportunities-from- http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/a-new-year-of-collaboration-fresh-resources-updates-and-opportunities-from-#When:21:03:00Z From the National Program Office

Urban Universities for HEALTH is in the news again. The UU-HEALTH team at the University of Cincinnati partnered with Interact for Health to conduct the 2015 Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP), asking Ohio adults about possible barriers they might have experienced when seeking a health care provider they could trust: lack of health insurance, type of health insurance and race or ethnicity. These barriers were reported twice as frequently among African American adults compared to white adults. Full poll results are available on the Interact for Health website.

In addition, one of the articles emerging from the Collaborative’s work on holistic admissions has recently been accepted for publication in the Journal of Professional Nursing. Holistic Admissions in Nursing: We Can Do This, shares findings from a series of nursing focus groups, explores barriers to implementing holistic review in nursing, and proposes solutions for overcoming those barriers.

 

Funding Opportunities

There is still time to apply for HRSA’s Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students, a grant program that provides funds to eligible accredited U.S. health professions schools to make scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds with financial need. The application deadline is January 25, 2016.

The Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation has released a call for applications for the 2016 Macy Faculty Scholars Program. This program supports scholars in implementing new educational initiatives and participating in career development activities. Applications are due February 17, 2016.

The David E. Rogers award, sponsored by AAMC and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, recognizes a medical school faculty member who has made major contributions to improving the health of the American people. Nominations for this $10,000 award are due May 6, 2016.

 

News

More than 80 admissions officials have signed on to a new report entitled Turning the Tide, Inspiring Concern for Others and the Common Good through College Admissions. The report suggests that colleges have excessively focused on traditional measures of academic achievement while neglecting other meaningful aspects of prospective students’ experience. The report urges colleges and universities to re-define achievement to level the playing field for students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

CVS Health has partnered with the National Black Nurses Association and the National Association of Hispanic Nurses to develop joint programs for facilitating multicultural talent acquisition and producing a diverse health workforce that reflects the patients and communities it serves. The partnerships will also allow CVS Health to offer more internships and scholarships to multicultural candidates.

New AAMC data reveals that female professors are woefully outnumbered at medical schools nationwide. The disparity is significant, as becoming a full professor is a necessary stepping stone for most leadership positions. School-by-school data on women’s representation in academic medicine are available.

In a Health Affairs blog, five health care organization CEOs weigh in on the Institute of Medicine’s new report, Vital Signs, which identifies core metrics for assessing the nation’s health.

UC Irvine plans to open a new nursing school with a $40 million gift from the William and Sue Gross Family Foundation. The new school will enrich the pipeline of nursing professionals and broaden the reach of community partnerships addressing the healthcare needs of underserved populations.

The US Government Accountability Office released a new report calling for more coordination of health workforce programs across HHS to meet national needs.

Urban Universities for HEALTH was cited in A Med Ed Revolution, a blog post that explores the sea change toward equity occurring in medical education.

NEOMED has appointed two new leaders to serve as co-chairs of the Community Advisory Board for the NEOMED-CSU Partnership for Urban Health.

 

Upcoming Events

The Association for Community Health Improvement will hold its national conference March 1-3, 2016 in Baltimore, MD.  

The Health Equity Initiative will hold a partnership summit, Implementing Systems-Level Change for Health Equity, on February 25-26, 2016 in New York, NY.

An AAMC webinar will explore how medical schools can attract more black males to the field of medicine. The webinar will be held February 4, 2015 at 12:00pm Eastern Time.

 

Publications and Resources

The National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) has opened a new web portal with free resources for mentors and mentees. As a key component of the NIH’s Diversity Program Consortium, NRMN’s mission is to support greater diversity within the NIH-funded workforce by implementing evidence-based programming to increase persistence and success in science careers. Resources include a virtual mentoring platform, intensive grant-writing groups, and training to maximize effectiveness as a mentor or mentee.

The Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) has released a new report on the use of holistic review in graduate admissions. Evidence from the Urban Universities for HEALTH study on holistic review in the health professions is cited.

The Ohio Governor's Office of Health Transformation released a report with recommendations for improving population health planning and aligning population health priority areas, measures, and evidence-based strategies. Ohio's performance on population health outcomes has declined relative to other states over the past two decades, and Ohio has significant disparities for many health outcomes by race, income and geography.

The AAMC has released its 2015 State Physician Workforce Data Book, a report with state-specific data on active physicians and residents. Also available from the AAMC: a free seminar on the science of unconscious bias and how to mitigate bias in the search and recruitment process.

 

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2016-01-20T21:03:00+00:00
<![CDATA[News from the Learning Collaborative]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/news-from-the-learning-collaborative http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/news-from-the-learning-collaborative#When:11:37:00Z From the National Program Office

Greetings and happy holidays from the Learning Collaborative! It has been a very busy fall for us. In October, the Learning Collaborative convened at the University of Cincinnati for our semi-annual meeting.  At the meeting, participants took a deep dive into the revised list of metrics and shared project updates from their institutions. The meeting included off-site visits to a community-based clinic and local high school that have partnered with UC, as well as a meeting with UC’s Community Advisory Board.
 
Members of the Learning Partners Network met at the APLU Annual Meeting in Indianapolis to share the results of their ongoing work on health and biomedical research workforce diversity with USU/APLU presidents and chancellors. Over the past six months, a set of cross-institutional working groups have been identifying gaps in evidence for institutional strategies that may improve diversity in the health and biomedical research workforce. The result was a list of action items for the USU/APLU to consider that will improve evidence and ultimately encourage adoption of evidence-based strategies among universities.
 
Finally, the USU/APLU and AAMC partnership was awarded a $325,000 grant from The California Wellness Foundation to support development of an assessment tool and scorecard for measuring institutional climate. Eight California-based universities will be selected to pilot the tool over the next several years.

 

Funding Opportunities

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has launched Systems for Action (S4A) a national program that studies novel ways of aligning the delivery and financing systems that support a Culture of Health. To be eligible for funding, studies must address one or more of the research priorities listed in the S4A Research Agenda and focus on one or more novel mechanisms for multi-sector alignment, integration, and improvement. A 3-page LOI is due January 12, 2016.

HRSA is soliciting applications to develop and implement innovative programs to address the oral health workforce needs of designated Dental HPSAs.  Eligible applicants include only Governor-appointed, State government entities, such as the office of the State’s dental director or a State-run university or dental school. Applications are due February 16, 2016.

The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation is soliciting applications for its 2016 Macy Faculty Scholars program. The program aims to accelerate needed reforms in health professions education to accommodate the dramatic changes occurring in medical practice and health care delivery. Each Scholar will receive salary support up to $100,000 per year over two years. Applications are due February 17, 2016.
 

Other Opportunities

The Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy is accepting abstracts for poster and podium presentations at the Ninth Health Disparities Conference in late February 2016. Abstracts should highlight interprofessional models integrating research, clinical and community approaches to improve health outcomes, eliminate health disparities, and achieve health equity. The deadline to submit abstracts is January 8, 2016.

 

News

Protests over race relations continue on campuses across the United States. The protests have been covered extensively by the media over the past few months; for an update, check out Inside Higher Ed’s recent article Race on Campus: The Latest. The Chronicle of Higher Education is offering readers the opportunity to download a collection of articles on race on campus. A complete list of student demands is available at thedemands.org, or you can read an analysis on the blog Five Thirty Eight Politics.
 
One of the issues that has been raised by student protesters is faculty diversity. The Chronicle of Higher Education argues that increased diversity is only the first step, as climate and retention issues remain, and HBCUs are concerned about losing their best faculty to competing institutions. Issues related to culture and climate are explored further in an article in the Atlantic, describing the experience of being a black professor on campus.
 
The Supreme Court recently heard oral arguments in the ongoing Fisher vs. the University of Texas at Austin case. SCOTUSblog provides a comprehensive analysis of issues at stake in the case. An independent analysis explores what may occur on campuses if a ban on race-conscious admissions is enacted.  In addition, AAMC submitted an amicus brief to the court, which may be of interest to medical educators.
 
Recent studies have revealed that African American males are severely underrepresented in the field of medicine. An article featuring Virginia Commonwealth University describes what some medical schools are doing to address diversity, including re-thinking admissions requirements.
 
For the first time in over 20 years, the National Institutes of Health has released an agency-wide strategic plan, which aims to establish a common approach for priority setting across the NIH.
 
Kaiser Permanente plans to open its own medical school in Southern California, which would enroll its first class in 2019. The school will take a different approach to medical education than established medical schools, focusing on rapid adoption of new technology and coordinated care.
 

Upcoming Events

Save the date for the USU Summer Meeting June 26-28, 2016! The meeting will be co-hosted by Portland State University in Portland, OR, and will feature an exciting new agenda and interactive meeting format.
 

Publications and Resources

The National Academy of Medicine recently released its Future of Nursing report, describing the ongoing lack of diversity in the nursing workforce, including both racial/ethnic diversity and gender diversity.
 
The Prevention Institute has released a set of 35 recommended metrics for measuring the social determinants of health and progress toward achieving health equity. Measuring What Works to Achieve Health Equity: Metrics for the Determinants of Health provides a framework for understanding how disparities in health outcomes are produced and how health equity can be realized.
 
An examination of the National Postbaccalaureate Collaborative (NPBC), a partnership of postbaccalaureate programs dedicated to helping promising college graduates from disadvantaged and underrepresented backgrounds get into and succeed in medical school, found that graduates of the programs were more likely to be providing care in federally designated underserved areas and practicing in institutional settings that enable access to care for vulnerable populations

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.
 

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2015-12-18T11:37:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Higher Education Recruitment Consortium features UU-HEALTH study in webinar on cluster hiring]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/higher-education-recruitment-consortium-features-uu-health-study-in-webinar http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/higher-education-recruitment-consortium-features-uu-health-study-in-webinar#When:22:48:00Z

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On Thursday, September 24, Urban Universities for HEALTH participated in a webinar hosted by the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC), entitled “Using Faculty “Cluster Hiring” to Increase Diversity, Enhance Collaboration and Improve Climate.” Faculty cluster hiring is an emerging strategy in which faculty are hired into multiple units or colleges to form collaborative, interdisciplinary “clusters.” Many universities have begun using this practice to hire a diverse group of faculty who are more likely to persist, thrive, and engage with their peers across campus. Earlier this year, a study conducted by Urban Universities for HEALTH found that faculty cluster hiring can be an effective strategy for improving diversity, interdisciplinary collaboration, and institutional climate, depending on how it is implemented.

The webinar featured three speakers: Dr. Saul Weiner, Vice Provost of Planning and Programs at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Jody Hironaka-Juteau, Dean of the College of Health and Human Services at California State University, Fresno, and Julia Michaels, Learning Collaborative Coordinator for Urban Universities for HEALTH. As VPPP, Dr. Weiner coordinates campus accreditation, strategic planning, and is the direct report for a variety of campus level units. He serves as co-chair of the provost’s cluster hire implementation advisory committee (CIAC). Dr. Hironaka-Juteau chairs the Fresno State President’s Commission on Human Relations and Equity and is recognized for her expertise and experience in the areas of diversity and inclusion training and collaboration. 

During the webinar, attendees heard key findings from the broader UU-HEALTH study and were provided with specific examples from the cluster hiring programs at UIC and Fresno State. The presenters also explored promising practices and additional resources that may be helpful to institutions seeking to adopt this practice on their own.

Although the live webinar was limited to HERC members, a recording of the webinar is available free of charge to the public:

 

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2015-09-24T22:48:00+00:00
<![CDATA[New Mexico Team Implements Strategy for Primary Care Residency Expansion]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-mexico-team-implements-strategy-for-primary-care-residency-expansion http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-mexico-team-implements-strategy-for-primary-care-residency-expansion#When:18:18:00Z A recently-published Health Affairs blog features an emerging strategy for expanding primary care residencies to meet local health workforce needs. New Mexico faces a severe shortage of primary care physicians and the congressional cap on Graduate Medical Education (GME) funding has prevented medical schools and teaching hospitals from adequately addressing the problem. In this article, Arthur Kaufman and Charlie Alfero from the University of New Mexico describe how a group of physicians, public health advocates, and legislators leveraged state Medicaid funds and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) to expand the number of primary care residency slots in the state.

Click here to read the article on the Health Affairs website: A State-Based Strategy For Expanding Primary Care Residency

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2015-08-07T18:18:00+00:00
<![CDATA[UU-HEALTH in the news: articles on holistic review, cluster hiring, and primary care]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/uu-health-in-the-news-articles-on-holistic-review-cluster-hiring-and-primar http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/uu-health-in-the-news-articles-on-holistic-review-cluster-hiring-and-primar#When:17:00:00Z From the National Program Office 

The Learning Collaborative is developing the next iteration of a metrics dashboard for key community health workforce measures. We plan to test a subset of the metrics at our next in-person meeting at the University of Cincinnati in October. Outreach to the broader Learning Partners Network continues with engagement in a set of action groups focused on identifying gaps in evidence for institutional strategies that may improve diversity in the health and biomedical research workforce. A presentation of this work is planned for the APLU Annual Meeting on November 15-17 in Indianapolis. A pre-conference workshop to disseminate findings from the faculty cluster hiring study released this spring is also planned (details TBA).

Our demonstration sites continue to make strides with their own on-campus efforts. The University of New Mexico team published an article in the Health Affairs blog on New Mexico’s state-based solution to expanding primary care residencies using Medicaid GME funding and changes to scope of practice guidelines at Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). The UNM Department of Dental Medicine was also awarded a $2.5 million grant from HRSA to develop a special needs dental clinic. The University of Cincinnati was covered by the media earlier this summer, in an article describing how African American and Hispanic enrollment has soared at UC. Finally, Meredith Bond, Co-PI at Cleveland State University, was appointed to a task force on diversity in the biomedical research workforce.
 

Funding Opportunities

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) will award up to $15.5 million in FY 2015 as part of the Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Awards program. These awards support projects that encourage active integration of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders as integral members of the patient-centered outcomes research/clinical effectiveness research (PCOR/CER) enterprise. LOIs are due October 1, 2015.
 
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation issued a call for proposals for the 2016 Future of Nursing Scholars program. Schools with research-focused PhD programs in nursing are eligible to apply for the program. Applications are due September 17.
 

News

The UU-HEALTH study on holistic admissions was cited in an article on Nurse.com. Dr. Greer Glazer, PI for the study and Co-PI from the University of Cincinnati, was quoted in a description of the benefits of holistic review for all students: “It exposes the whole class to different individuals with different viewpoints, and the whole group is more open to ideas and perspectives different from their own. They also have much higher rates of cooperation and teamwork and student engagement within the community.”
 
Our study was also cited in a new report by the American Council on Education (ACE), which examines how legal challenges to race-conscious admissions are influencing contemporary admissions practices at selective colleges and universities around the country. Media coverage of the report focused on the various strategies universities are using to increase diversity without affirmative action. The report, entitled Race, Class, and College Access: Achieving Diversity in a Shifting Legal Landscape, is available for download from the ACE website.
 
The UU-HEALTH study on faculty cluster hiring was covered by this month’s issue of University Business. The article described how cluster hiring has been used to increase faculty diversity and improve institutional climate, and included examples from three USU/APLU institutions: Fresno State University, North Carolina State University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
 
A new AAMC report, entitled Altering the Course: Black Males in Medicine, reports that the number of underrepresented minority applicants and graduates of medical schools has largely remained stagnant over the past decade. The study outlines challenges that black males face in academic medicine and identifies keys to student success, including resilience, an adequate support system, and access to quality mentoring.
 
Last month, George Washington University joined the ranks of institutions that have scrapped admissions tests for undergraduate applicants. Their decision underscores a growing trend in test-optional admissions, which stems from research suggesting that standardized tests are a barrier to recruiting disadvantaged students.
 

Upcoming Events

The American Public Health Association will host a webinar entitled Unequal Treatment: Disparities in Access, Quality and Care on August 25, 2:00 p.m. EDT.

The Harvard School of Public Health will host an inaugural forum on population health equity on September 10-11.
 
The AAMC GREAT and GRAND groups will hold a professional development meeting on September 9-12 in Baltimore, MD. Research deans, graduate deans, deans of clinical research, MD-PhD and postdoctoral program leaders, and all those with an interest in advancing biomedical research and research training are invited to attend.
 
Registration is open for the AAMC Annual Meeting on November 6-10 in Baltimore, MD. Registration is also open for the APLU Annual Meeting November 15-17 in Indianapolis, IN.
 

Publications and Resources

A new study from Upstate Medical University found that medical school mission statements may influence student outcomes. Medical schools whose mission statements underscore societal good and a desire to train students for service to at-risk populations are more likely to produce physicians who will enter careers in primary care (such as family medicine) and work in medically underserved areas.
 
LGBT health care professionals who viewed their work environment as inclusive also reported greater personal and professional development, according to a new study published in LGBT Health. The findings demonstrate the value of institutional policies that advance the community's visibility on campus and provide a framework for academic medical centers that want to develop or strengthen such practices.
 
A Pew Research Center study found that over the past year, there has been a marked increase in the percentage of Americans — across racial and ethnic groups — who say that racism is a big problem in society and that the country should continue making changes to ensure racial equity.  
 
Ed Salsberg authored a perspective piece in Academic Medicine in response to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Governance and Financing of Graduate Medical Education report calling for an overhaul of the GME financing system. He argues that increased utilization of interprofessional teams and efficiencies resulting from technological innovation have reduced the projected physician shortage – although shortages still exist in some communities and in some specialties.

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2015-08-07T17:00:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Learning Collaborative shares what we do (and don’t) know about diversifying the workforce]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-shares-what-we-do-and-dont-know-about-diversifying-t http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-shares-what-we-do-and-dont-know-about-diversifying-t#When:14:53:00Z From the National Program Office

Members of the Learning Collaborative and Learning Partners Network convened at Cleveland State University last month to share emerging evidence from Urban Universities for HEALTH. Participants discussed the potential for bringing evidence-based interventions to scale across the university and in other disciplines, and identified gaps in knowledge where further research will be needed. Topics included institutional success, campus climate, admissions, minority student success, faculty hiring and success, and cross-institutional partnerships. Members of the Learning Partners Network will continue these conversations over the coming months with the aim of developing an action plan for further research on institutional strategies that may improve diversity in health fields, contribute to a more inclusive campus climate, and reduce health disparities.

Funding Opportunities

Eligible health professions schools may be interested in applying for support through HRSA’s Health Workforce Research Center (HWRC) program. The program supports research that will enhance the government’s understanding of emerging issues and trends in the health care workforce. Applications are due July 23, 2015.
 
NIMHD has announced a limited competition grant to build capacity and research infrastructure for minority health and health disparities research. Funding cannot be used to support the research projects themselves. Letters of intent are due August 4, 2015, with complete applications due on September 4.
  
The AAMC and The Patrick Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation have partnered to offer Advancing Implementation Science in Community/Academic Partnered Research, an opportunity for academic medical centers to collaboratively engage in research that has the potential for near-term impact to improve population health outcomes. The research should facilitate collaborations among researchers, community organizations, and health system leaders. Proposals are due October 16, 2015.

News

The University of Cincinnati College of Pharmacy recently completed a hiring surge to fulfill several partnerships with external organizations. These partnerships will support new research that will benefit local hospitals and underserved communities. So far, the College has added eight new assistant professors with additional openings planned. Neil MacKinnon, dean of the College, called it the “largest ever one-time hiring of new faculty in the history of the college.”
 
Cleveland State University has received a $5.5 million grant from the Cleveland Foundation to support the NEOMED-CSU Partnership for Urban Health. This is the largest gift the partnership has received and will fund education of health professions students in primary care to reduce health disparities in underserved Cleveland communities.
 
NPR social science correspondent Shankar Vendantam shares new research on the efficacy of medical school efforts to recruit a diverse student body in the wake of several state bans on race-conscious admissions policies.
 
On a similar note, the Supreme Court has decided to revisit the use of race in admissions by agreeing to re-open the case Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin.
 
In Cuyahoga County, Ohio, a new partnership has released a plan to address poor health and health inequities in the region.  Unlike many other public health efforts, the plan will address structural and institutional racism as well as factors specific to geography.

Publications and Resources

A new article in Nursing Outlook explores how a holistic admissions process may increase diversity among nursing students and professionals, and how the process itself can be used as a catalyst for institutional change.
 
As part of AAMC’s Diversity 3.0 Learning Series, Chief Diversity Officer Marc A. Nivet Ed.D. interviews Howard Ross, Founder & Chief Learning Officer of Cook Ross and author of Reinventing Diversity: Transforming Organizational Community to Strengthen People, Purpose and Performance. In this video, Dr. Nivet and Mr. Ross explore how and why diversity efforts plateau at institutions, what role unconscious bias plays in these situations, and discuss how to mitigate unconscious bias to increase the success of diversity initiatives.

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2015-07-08T14:53:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Which Strategies are Most Effective for Improving Health Workforce Diversity?]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/which-strategies-are-most-effective-for-improving-health-workforce-diversit http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/which-strategies-are-most-effective-for-improving-health-workforce-diversit#When:14:48:00Z From the NPO

At the upcoming USU Summer Meeting (June 15-16 at Cleveland State University), we will present what our collaborative has learned from working with many institutions to improve health workforce diversity, competence, and distribution in urban communities. Although this will not be a working meeting for Urban Universities for HEALTH, we are looking forward to sharing new knowledge with the broader network of urban universities within USU.  It’s not too late to register for the USU Summer Meeting – visit the event page for more information.

Funding Opportunities

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has issued a call for proposals for national leadership program centers. RWJF will select up to four organizations to receive a three-month planning grant to co-develop and prepare the launch of leadership programs, with a maximum amount of $750,000 per award per program. The deadline to submit a proposal is July 29, 2015.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) is now recruiting for the next class of EIS officers. EIS is a 2-year fellowship in applied epidemiology, open to physicians with at least one year of clinical training, doctoral-level scientists, veterinarians, and other healthcare professionals. EIS officers conduct epidemiologic investigations, research, and public health surveillance around the world. Applications are due August 17, 2015.

The NIH has issued two funding announcements related to health disparities. Advancing Health Disparities Interventions Through Community-Based Participatory Research (U01) will support collaborative intervention projects addressing health disparities (LOI due July 3, 2015). The NIMHD Transdisciplinary Collaborative Centers for Health Disparities Research Focused on Precision Medicine (U54) will assist institutions exploring the potential of precision medicine to promote health equity and reduce health disparities (LOI due August 17, 2015).

News

The Chronicle of Higher Education recently published an extensive special report on first-generation college students. The report highlights programs that have created pathways to success, describes key barriers such as lack of child care, and includes op-eds from first-generation students reflecting on their experiences.

A Health Affairs blog by Ed Salsberg reports updated numbers for the pipeline of nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and pharmacists, all of whom are integral to the primary care workforce. Patterns across professions show steady, strong growth. Salsberg writes that these data highlight “the importance of considering the pipeline for these providers when we assess our health care workforce needs.”

An opinion piece in the New York Times entitled The Case for Black Doctors describes how increasing the number of black physicians will improve health outcomes for a population that consistently fares the worst in our health care system.

Updates from our demonstration sites include:

The Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) and Medical Mutual of Ohio have partnered to establish the Medical Mutual Pharmacy Scholars Program. In exchange for substantial scholarship support, students must work for one year in an underserved rural or urban community covered by Medical Mutual.

The Brooklyn Free Clinic (BFC), a student-run clinic for the uninsured, recently celebrated 8 years of service to the community. The BFC was founded by medical students attending SUNY Downstate and has grown to include a full-fledged nursing student volunteer program, specialty referrals, and free prescriptions for many common medications.

Upcoming Events

The Association of Clinicians for the Underserved (ACU) will hold their annual conference and workforce forum on June 1-3 in Alexandria, Virginia.

On June 2, 2015, AAMC will host a webinar entitled Teaching Population Health: Innovative Medical School Curricula for Environmental Health. The 90-minute webinar will feature innovative ways to teach environmental health in clinically relevant scenarios; it will also include an extended audience Q&A session.

The 2015 Quality & Equity Roadmap meeting hosted by the American Hospital Association’s Symposium for Leaders in Healthcare Quality will be held in San Francisco, California on July 22, 2015. The meeting will convene health care professionals with an interest in quality, equity and excellence to advance the shared mission of improving community health.

Early bird registration ends August 31 for the AAMC Annual Meeting, which will take place November 6-10, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.

Publications and Resources

An article in Academic Medicine describes how the social environment and academic discourse within medical schools can influence students’ identification with family medicine. The researchers studied medical schools in the United Kingdom, Canada, France, and Spain, and concluded that positive discourse and early exposure to family medicine role models impact students’ specialty choices.

A new Institute of Medicine report proposes a streamlined set of 15 standardized measures that health professionals, payers, and policymakers can use to understand and achieve the aim of better health at lower cost. An IOM committee concluded that these measures could provide consistent benchmarks for health progress across the nation and improve system performance in priority areas. Download the report, VITAL SIGNS: Core Metrics for Health and Health Care Progress, or watch the recording of the press release.

A new literature review published in Human Resources for Health revisits more than 60 years of documented research to better understand time-tested methodologies for healthcare workforce planning.

How many new residency spots will we need to avoid a primary care physician shortage by 2035?  A recent article in the Annals of Family Medicine attempts to estimate the projected primary care physician shortage over the next 20 years and determine the amount and composition of residency growth needed. The researchers conclude that residency production must increase by 21% compared with current production.

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2015-05-29T14:48:00+00:00
<![CDATA[New publication from UU-HEALTH, and grant funding announcements]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-publication-from-uu-health-and-grant-funding-announcements http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-publication-from-uu-health-and-grant-funding-announcements#When:14:40:00Z From the National Program Office

Urban Universities for HEALTH recently released a report finding that faculty “cluster” hiring, an emerging practice designed to expand interdisciplinary research, can also be used to increase faculty diversity and cultivate a more inclusive campus climate. The report was officially released by a panel of thought leaders via a live webcast event, which was recorded and can be viewed on the Urban Universities for HEALTH website. President Michael Drake, Ohio State University; Chancellor Randy Woodson, North Carolina State University; Susan Phillips, SUNY Downstate/University at Albany, SUNY; and Marc Nivet, AAMC, spoke at the online event. If you only have a few minutes, check out the highlights reel (3.5 min). The report was also covered by several major higher education news outlets, including the Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and Education Dive.

The Learning Collaborative was also mentioned in the April/May issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine for last year’s study on holistic admissions in the health professions (see p. 59).

Funding Opportunities

SAMHSA has announced a grant for Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) to partner with Community-Based Organizations (CBOs) to prevent and reduce substance abuse and transmission of HIV/AIDS among at-risk populations.  Up to $300,000 per institution will be awarded. Applications are due on Tuesday, May 26, 2015.

The NIMHD Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) is designed to help outstanding postdoctoral researchers who are conducting minority health and health disparities research transition to an independent, tenure-track faculty position or equivalent. Applications are due June 23, 2015.

The U.S. Department of Education has launched a $60 million competition entitled “First in the World,” which will provide grants to higher education institutions to develop innovations that improve educational outcomes and make college more affordable for students and families, and to develop an evidence base of effective practices. The application deadline is June 30, 2015.

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has announced a $60 million science education initiative that will fund more than 1,500 U.S. institutions that offer degrees in the biomedical sciences. The initiative challenges colleges and universities to “increase their capacity to engage all students in science.” HHMI plans to award 60 grants in two open competitions. All awards will be for five years and total $1 million. The intent to apply deadline is July 14, 2015.         

NIMHD will soon publish a funding announcement for transdisciplinary collaborative centers for health disparities research focused on precision medicine. The announcement will be made sometime in May – please stay tuned. NIMHD has also issued a request for information, soliciting input into the scientific planning process to define a vision that will guide the development of the science of health disparities research over the next decade. Responses will be accepted through July 31, 2015.

Other Opportunities

The NIMHD Translational Health Disparities Course is a two-week intensive course held August 3-14, 2015, on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. The course provides an introduction to the principles and practice of health disparities research. Applications are due by midnight Eastern Time on Tuesday, May 26, 2015.

News

Bi-partisan legislation was recently introduced in Congress to increase the number of graduate medical education (GME) slots over the next five years at teaching hospitals and academic medical centers.  Half of the 3,000 slots that would be created each year must be used for a “shortage specialty residency program,” as defined by HRSA. 

Ana Mari Cauce, the interim president of the University of Washington, is launching a new race and equity initiative on her campus. The purpose of the effort is to get students to recognize and celebrate their differences rather than ignoring them. Cauce says that acknowledging diversity and fully embracing it can lead to new ideas, innovation and, ultimately, success.

Two articles published this month discussed disruption in medical education. In the Pacific Standard, Leslie Fall writes about MedU, a provider of online clinical learning. She argues that by delivering some components of the medical school curriculum online, schools can both lower costs and increase the number of clinical placements in community-based, rural, or underserved areas. However, in MedPage Today, Robert Frazier – a graduate of a 3-year medical program that operated in the 1940s – pushes back against “academic compression,” arguing that “stuffing too much education in too fast diminishes your capacity to enjoy as many aspects of your own self and interests as you can.”

Upcoming Events

The Synthesis Engagement and Elevation to Eliminate Disparities (SEED) Symposium is a national conference that will use cutting-edge approaches to generate new findings and resources to eliminate health disparities.  The themes for the symposium are: multidisciplinary focus, multiple levels of intervention, culturally-responsive practices, and the use of storytelling as a research tool. The conference will take place June 11-12, 2015 in Worcester, MA.

The 10th Annual USU Summer Meeting will be held from June 15-16, 2015 at Cleveland State University in Cleveland, OH.  The theme is “Deep Collaboration: Urban Universities Shaping the Future of the City.” Register today to guarantee your spot.

The Hispanic-Serving Health Professions Schools (HSHPS) is offering a professional development workshop, Catapult Your Research Career Using Public Data Sets. This OMH/NIH-funded workshop aims to prepare scholars interested in Hispanic health research strengthen their skills and  knowledge to perform analytical studies of public health datasets to better contribute to Hispanic and other underserved populations. The workshop will take place from June 28-30, 2015 in Bethesda, MD.

The National College Access Network (NCAN) will hold its 20th anniversary national conference in Orlando, Florida from September 28-30. The conference theme is Leading the Way in College Access and Attainment, and attendees will be able to learn and share strategies for helping more students succeed in postsecondary education.

Publications and Resources

Excelencia in Education has released Finding Your Workforce: Latinos in Health, which identifies the top institutions graduating Latinos in healthcare fields for 2012-13, and spotlights replicable practices and efforts at select colleges and universities. It also offers opportunities for action to improve Latinos’ retention and degree completion and increase their representation in the healthcare workforce.

The latest AAMC Health Equity Research Snapshot focuses on mental health, with videos from seven new federally-funded research projects underway at AAMC-member institutions. Topics range from PTSD in women veterans (neuropsychiatry research) to the effects of state and federal policies on autism care (health policy research). Also from AAMC: the May 2015 diversity research and data snapshot, which focuses on racial and ethnic diversity in the physician-scientist workforce.

The National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities has developed a compendium of publicly-available federal datasets pertinent to research and programs aiming to end health disparities.

Last month, AHRQ released its 2014 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report, and HRSA released its U.S. health workforce projections. SAMHSA has also published a new report on racial/ethnic differences in mental health service use.

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2015-05-15T14:40:00+00:00
<![CDATA[New Report Finds University “Cluster” Hiring Can Be Effective for Increasing Faculty Diversity]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-report-finds-university-cluster-hiring-can-be-effective-for-increasing- http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-report-finds-university-cluster-hiring-can-be-effective-for-increasing-#When:19:49:00Z

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WASHINGTON, DC (April 30, 2015) – A new report released by a group of three leading higher education organizations -- the Coalition for Urban Serving Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and the Association for American Medical Colleges, which have partnered as “Urban Universities for HEALTH” -- finds that faculty “cluster” hiring, an emerging practice designed to expand interdisciplinary research, can also be used to increase faculty diversity and cultivate a more inclusive campus climate. The report, Faculty Cluster Hiring for Diversity and Institutional Climate, is the product of research conducted with universities that have developed cluster hiring programs.

“Cluster hiring is a very valuable strategy for public universities, all of whom want to recruit the best faculty and get ahead in a competitive research landscape,” said Association of Public and Land-grant Universities President Peter McPherson. “Attracting a diverse group of scholars who arrive with the intention of collaborating across disciplinary lines with a collegial group of scholars helps universities propel themselves toward research excellence and ensure success for the diverse student populations they serve.”

Faculty cluster hiring is an innovative strategy that involves recruiting new faculty into multiple disciplines and engaging them in collaborative, interdisciplinary research topics across the university. The strategy promises to transform higher education through the development of diverse research teams that will address some of society’s most complex challenges.

Evidence from this study and others suggest that diversity and an inclusive campus climate are critically important for institutional excellence.  Diverse teams have been shown to produce higher-quality research outcomes and unique solutions to problems, as well as an improved learning environment for all students. An inclusive climate also helps retain talented faculty and students, ensuring that the university graduates a workforce that meets community needs.

“Many universities have begun to hire new faculty into these clusters to accelerate research and create collaborations across disciplines,” said Susan Phillips, senior vice president for academic affairs at SUNY Downstate, vice president for strategic partnerships at University at Albany, SUNY, and chair of the advisory committee that led the study. “What we learned through this study is that with the right focus and support for implementation, cluster hiring can also be used to build a diverse group of faculty that will not only be successful, but also collaborate with each other, engage with their communities, and enrich the teaching and learning environment.”

However, the authors noted that these outcomes are highly dependent on the university’s goals for the cluster, as well as the way in which the cluster hiring program is implemented. Successful institutions made diversity goals explicit and developed supporting strategies to achieve those goals. They also dedicated resources and infrastructure to support the clusters, and ensured new hires were given credit for collaborative work they performed as part of the cluster in the tenure and promotion process.

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Urban Universities for HEALTH

Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership and Transformation of the Health Workforce), a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). Urban Universities for HEALTH aims to improve evidence and the use of data that will help universities enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse and prepared health workforce that will improve health and health equity in underserved urban communities.

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2015-04-30T19:49:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Coalition of Urban Serving Universities to Release New Report in Live Webcast Event]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/invitation-coalition-of-urban-serving-universities-to-release-new-report-in http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/invitation-coalition-of-urban-serving-universities-to-release-new-report-in#When:18:15:00Z

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On April 30, 2015, from 2:30-3:30 p.m. Eastern Time, the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) will hold a virtual release of a new report on the use of faculty “cluster hiring” as a strategy for increasing faculty diversity, accelerating research excellence, and improving institutional climate.

In addition to sharing key findings from the report, the live webcast will feature a panel discussion with higher education leaders, including:

  • Michael V. Drake, President, The Ohio State University
  • Randy Woodson, Chancellor, North Carolina State University
  • Susan D. Phillips, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, SUNY Downstate, and Vice President for Strategic Partnerships, University at Albany, SUNY
  • Marc Nivet, Chief Diversity Officer, Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)

The event will be of interest to university leaders seeking to learn from institutions that have implemented this practice, and who share the goal of building a diverse faculty body that will propel interdisciplinary research and enrich the teaching and learning environment. An electronic version of the report will be available for download after the event at urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org

Faculty cluster hiring is an emerging practice in higher education and involves hiring faculty into multiple departments or colleges around interdisciplinary research topics, or “clusters.” Although the core purpose is research excellence, some cluster hiring programs also aim to increase faculty diversity and cultivate a more inclusive campus climate, as measured by: career success of faculty from all backgrounds, collaboration across disciplines, an enriched teaching and learning environment, and community engagement. However, cluster hiring programs have been implemented in different ways with varying outcomes, and additional evidence was needed to identify key factors for success.

In June 2013, Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) presidents requested new research on faculty cluster hiring and a set of best practices to support the use of this strategy for improving faculty diversity and campus climate. An advisory committee of USU/APLU provosts and other experts was convened to lead an in-depth qualitative research study examining institutions with successful cluster hiring programs.

The project was facilitated by Urban Universities for HEALTH, a partnership effort of USU/APLU with the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD).

When:  2:30–3:30 p.m. EDT, Thursday, April 30, 2015

Where: This event is online

RSVP: Register for the live webcast at http://bit.ly/1qPRWM1

ContactJulia Michaels, Urban Universities for HEALTH

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Urban Universities for HEALTH

Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership and Transformation of the Health Workforce), is a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). Urban Universities for HEALTH aims to improve evidence and the use of data that will help universities enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse and prepared health workforce that will improve health and health equity in underserved urban communities.

The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities

The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) is a president-led organization committed to escalating urban university engagement to increase prosperity and opportunity in the nation’s cities, and to tackling key urban challenges. The USU includes 40 public urban research universities representing all U.S. geographic regions. The USU agenda focuses on creating a competitive workforce, building strong communities, and improving the health of a diverse population. The USU has partnered with the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) to establish an Office of Urban Initiatives, housed at APLU, to jointly lead an urban agenda for the nation’s public universities.

 

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2015-04-28T18:15:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Urban Universities for HEALTH develops first iteration of a national dashboard]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/urban-universities-for-health-develops-first-iteration-of-a-national-dashbo http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/urban-universities-for-health-develops-first-iteration-of-a-national-dashbo#When:20:54:00Z

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“If you’re all working on the same thing but don’t define it in the same way, what’s the likelihood that you’re going to be successful?” This question, posed by speaker Natalie Burke from CommonHealth ACTION, set the tone for the Learning Collaborative’s fifth in-person meeting, held last week in Scottsdale, Arizona.  As the Learning Collaborative closes in on a set of common health workforce metrics, the accuracy of definitions and standardization of data sources emerged as main themes.

The meeting began with an inspirational speech from Natalie Burke, President and CEO of CommonHealth ACTION, a national public health organization that aligns people, strategies, and resources to create community-generated solutions to health and policy challenges. Arguing that “health equity is not optional,” Ms. Burke led the group in an interactive exercise to define equity and brainstorm changes that may occur in health professions education and practice if true health equity is realized. In recognition of the need for broader culture change at the university, the group outlined a business case for equity, for example: attracting the best students with an inclusive campus climate, recruiting and retaining talented faculty from all backgrounds, and positioning graduates for future care delivery models. Showing how equity impacts the university’s bottom line will help the Collaborative achieve “perspective transformation” on their campuses, balancing moral arguments for equity (e.g., “it’s the right thing to do”) with arguments based on outcomes and evidence.

Prior to the meeting, demonstration sites collected local data for 16 health workforce metrics that together represent all dimensions of the metrics framework developed during Phase 2. The National Program Office (NPO) used these data to populate a prototype dashboard comparing outcomes from demonstration sites with national benchmarks (where available). Discussion around the prototype dashboard was intense; by “making it real,” the dashboard helped participants begin to see which metrics needed more clarity and definition, where data should be standardized, and which metrics were most useful to all sites. Teams shared their processes for collecting the data and discussed the challenges associated with obtaining data from different units on campus. The NPO plans to incorporate this feedback into the next iteration of the dashboard.

One of the primary goals of Urban Universities for HEALTH is to disseminate knowledge and ideas that have been generated through collaborative work.  The session “Ideas for Impact” was designed to help sites select five projects nearing completion for dissemination via a blog, white paper, peer-reviewed article, or other media source. Site teams met with a professional writer to begin shaping the publications. Selected projects for dissemination included:

  • The Healthcare Occupational Knowledge Assessment (HOKA) from CSU/NEOMED
  • The University of Cincinnati’s social media campaign to recruit underrepresented local students
  • The role of institutional support in diversity initiatives, based on the experience of the University of Missouri-Kansas City
  • “Busting through the Residency Cap,” a strategy for increasing state funding of Graduate Medical Education (GME), developed by the University of New Mexico
  • A multimedia project to engage local students in considering health careers, developed by SUNY Downstate

Dr. Imam Xierali closed the meeting by sharing an illustrative example of the types of longitudinal data available from AAMC for medical students – from application to workforce participation. Data were limited to Cuyahoga County, Ohio, the Geographic Scope of Impact (GSI) for CSU/NEOMED, although similar data are available for other counties. The presentation helped the Collaborative think more strategically about data collection, in particular how to leverage existing sources so that institutions do not need to collect all the data themselves. However, it remains to be seen how these longitudinal datasets can be collected for all health professions, as the AAMC datasets are limited to medicine.

One of the biggest highlights of the meeting for participants was the opportunity to network with their peers. Urban Universities for HEALTH shared the meeting space with two other learning collaboratives funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation: Completion by Design (CBD), and the USU Transformational Planning Grant (TPG). The three groups interacted around shared goals related to student access and success through informal networking during break times as well as two formal joint sessions: an opening plenary and small-group session to discuss common challenges.

By the end of the meeting, participants agreed that each demonstration site is at a different point in the process of developing metrics, and that some health professions have better data sources than others. Moving forward, the Collaborative will seek to identify datasets relevant to each site’s geographic area, as well as data that are already available and collected by others. In developing metrics, sites plan to include all primary care providers in metrics for primary care (not just physicians), clarify each metric’s parameters so that we are comparing “apples to apples,” and think critically about different metrics that can address the same intent.

 

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2015-04-08T20:54:00+00:00
<![CDATA[UC launches social media campaign]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/uc-launches-social-media-campaign http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/uc-launches-social-media-campaign#When:17:04:00Z

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From the National Program Office

The Learning Collaborative held a successful in-person working meeting last week in Scottsdale, AZ. At the meeting, we refined the first iteration of a dashboard for key health workforce metrics, reviewed existing data sources for longitudinal tracking of students, and presented completed projects to be published and disseminated broadly.  A summary of meeting highlights and key lessons learned will be shared in the next issue.

The University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center launched an innovative social media campaign to engage local students around health career pathways. The campaign includes a video and a fun, Buzzfeed-style quiz designed to help students identify a health discipline that fits their personality.  The UC AHC hopes that the campaign will help them recruit more diverse students from area high schools and engage them earlier in planning for a health career. The project was conducted as part of UC’s participation in the Urban Universities for HEALTH initiative, and received additional funding through a competitive process. The launch was also covered by the USU’s Urban University blog. We are thrilled about the launch of this new resource and look forward to seeing it in action! 

Funding Opportunities

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Simons Foundation have created a new partnership to provide research support to outstanding early-career scientists. The philanthropies will award $150 million over the next five years to promising scientists with potential to make unique contributions to their field. Awards will range from $100,000-$400,000 for direct costs as well as 20 percent in indirect costs to the scientist’s home institution. In addition to funding, the program will provide mentoring opportunities and other resources. Scientists who wish to be considered for this competition must submit their completed applications through the HHMI website by July 28, 2015.

The Department of Health and Human Services will award up to $500,000 per recipient through the National Workforce Diversity Pipeline Program (NWDP). The program seeks to address health disparities among racial and ethnic minorities by supporting networks of institutions with capacity to establish pipeline programs to increase minority student pursuit of health careers. Colleges and universities are eligible to apply, and applications are due May 18, 2015.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) will award small research grants in the amount of $100,000 for different types of health services research projects including pilot and feasibility studies, secondary analysis of existing data, and development of research methodology. Applications will be accepted beginning May 16, 2015, with Cycle II applications due June 16 and Cycle III applications due October 16.

News

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has awarded funding to 48 nurses at 25 schools of nursing through the Future of Nursing Scholars program.  Recipients include two scholars at the University of Cincinnati, and two scholars at the University of Minnesota.

The American Academy of Nursing’s Institute for Nursing Leadership has launched a new strategy to increase nurse participation on governing boards.  This push is in response to the 2011 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report which recommended nurses increase their presence on governing boards to improve the health care system.

Yale University has announced that it will launch a new, online physician assistant (PA) program. Accreditation for the program is still pending but, if approved, it would become the nation’s first fully online PA degree program.

A special issue of Fast Company, The Future of Work, includes an article highlighting the non-profit PhD Project for its efforts to increase the diversity of university faculty. The program uses mentoring, coaching, and peer-support networks to increase doctoral student success. Although health care fields are not included in the project, the strategies employed have strong outcomes and may be of benefit to other disciplines seeking to learn from the project’s experience. For example, the minority doctoral completion rate for students in the PhD Project is 90%, while the average overall U.S. doctoral program completion rate is just 70%.

A new medical residency program in southwest Florida aims to train young physicians as family practice doctors in an already medically underserved community and (ideally) persuade them to practice in the area once their residencies are complete. The new program was described in an article by USA Today, which also noted that a group of Florida teaching and safety net hospitals has formally asked state lawmakers for $20 million in recurring funds to create new residency slots for high-demand specialties.

Another USA Today article describes how, contrary to popular expectations, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has not dramatically increased demand for health care services. The authors note that uninsured patients make up a much lower proportion of visitors to primary care doctors than before, especially in states that expanded Medicaid, but that “the delivery system is able to handle the demand.”

Upcoming Events

Physicians may be interested in attending the 2015 National Minority Quality Forum (NMQF) Leadership Summit on Health Disparities. The conference will take place from April 20-21, 2015 in Washington, DC.

Health Datapalooza will be held May 31-June 3, 2015 in Washington, DC. This national conference brings together the companies, agencies, and individuals with the newest and most innovative uses of health data to improve patient outcomes.

The 10th Annual USU Summer Meeting will be held June 15-16, 2015 at Cleveland State University. The theme of this year’s meeting is “Deep Collaboration: Urban Universities Shaping the Future of the City.” Registration is open and early-bird rates continue through May 25th.

Publications and Resources

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has released its 2015 County Health Rankings. The key findings report includes a summary of national data with metrics for health workforce, education, and population health outcomes. The report finds that although premature death rates have declined nationwide, significant health disparities remain. New this year: an indicator for income inequality.

AAMC published a resource for educators and researchers interested in assessing the impact of cultural competence education and training. The report provides an inventory of studies related to cultural competence, tools for evaluating the quality and psychometric properties of existing surveys, and sample evaluation frameworks.

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation has released a new report, Equal Talents, Unequal Opportunities: A Report Card on State Support for Academically Talented Low-Income Students. The report grades states on 18 simple metrics and finds that state policies nationwide fail to support high-potential students from low-income backgrounds.

The Commonwealth Fund has published an issue brief describing how health insurance can reduce disparities in access to care.

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2015-04-02T17:04:00+00:00
<![CDATA[New Research on Health Equity and Health Workforce Diversity]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-reseearch-on-health-equity-and-health-workforce-diversity http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-reseearch-on-health-equity-and-health-workforce-diversity#When:17:05:00Z

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From the NPO

The Learning Collaborative is gearing up for its next in-person meeting on March 24-26 in Scottsdale, AZ. At this meeting, we will use data gathered by our demonstration sites to construct a prototype of the metrics dashboard – one of the primary deliverables of the Urban Universities for HEALTH project. We will also review and select some of the sites’ accomplishments for publication and dissemination, so that we can better share our work with other universities. Please stay tuned for updates regarding these publications and additional events in April.

Funding Opportunities

The AAMC AHEAD (Accelerating Health Equity, Advancing through Discovery) Initiative has issued a call for proposals. The initiative aims to build an evidence base of effective policies and practices that improve community health and minimize health inequities. The RFP will fund three AAMC-member institution projects over three years to evaluate the impact of their existing medical-legal partnerships on community health measures, cost savings to the health system, and learner outcomes. Applications are due March 20, 2015.

Nursing scholars may be interested in the Distinguished IOM Nurse Scholar in Residence program, which provides a year-long residential leadership opportunity in health policy in Washington, DC. Applications are due April 1, 2015.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has announced the Awards for Eliminating Health Disparities program, which recognizes individuals who have successfully implemented systems changes related to the determinants of health. Ten national non-profit membership organizations or associations will be chosen to administer the awards programs. Organizations must have experience with systems change in areas that influence health outcomes. The deadline for proposals is April 14, 2015.

The Missouri Foundation for Health has issued an open call for concept papers proposing time-limited, outcome-focused approaches designed to address a pressing community health need. Funding varies based on the need identified in the proposal. Concept papers will be accepted through April 20, 2015.

Nominations for a number of AAMC awards are due May 1, 2015find out more.

The NIH has announced that training and research project grants and an institutional training grant are available to enhance predoctoral and postdoctoral research training and education to ensure that a diverse and highly qualified workforce is available to address the nation’s biomedical and social sciences research agenda. Applications for both competitions are due September 25, 2015.

News

The deans of the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, and the University of Kansas School of Medicine convened in front of students, faculty, and community leaders to highlight their commitment to multicampus collaboration and sharing best practices in medical education.  

Dean Greer Glazer, Co-PI from the University of Cincinnati for Urban Universities for HEALTH, was re-elected to the board of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN).

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has released its Budget “In Brief” for FY 2016. Highlights include a 4% increase in funding for NIH and $14 million for a new Health Workforce Diversity Program within HRSA.  However, the Title VII Health Careers Opportunity Program and Title VII Area Health Education Centers program (AHEC) would be eliminated.

In Michigan, Governor Rick Snyder has proposed a 2016 budget calling for repeal of all state funding for graduate medical education (GME) – which will also result in the loss of matching federal funds.

A study published in the Journal of Higher Education found that public medical schools affected by bans on race-conscious admissions experienced a 17 percent decline in the share of first-time matriculants who were black, Hispanic, or Native American, a figure in keeping with studies of the impact of such bans on selective undergraduate programs, graduate programs, and law schools.

On the same topic, an opinion piece written by Harvard Graduate Jeff Yang criticizes the recent lawsuit filed against Harvard University for its race-conscious admissions practices and argues that the suit is politically motivated. Yang states that holistic review has helped students from all backgrounds succeed in higher education, and that getting into college is about “more than just scores.”

An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education suggests that simply filling the pipeline with students from diverse backgrounds won’t be enough to diversify STEM fields. According to a recent study of biomedical Ph.D.’s, underrepresented minorities and women showed disproportionately low interest in pursuing an academic career at a research university upon completing graduate school. The study’s lead author noted that getting more people into the system was “a laudable goal, but it takes the attention away from the structural elements that have a profound impact on career choice."

A new report entitled Double Jeopardy: Gender Bias Against Women of Color in Science describes how Black and Latina women scientists are routinely discriminated against – including being mistaken for janitors.

A study from the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce finds that despite the nationwide nursing shortage and strong interest in nursing careers, nursing schools can’t expand quickly enough to admit as many students as they would like. The study highlights nursing faculty shortages as a persistent problem underlying schools’ inability to expand.

Ricardo Azziz, president of Georgia Reagents University, authored an op-ed in the Huffington Post suggesting that universities should apply lessons learned from the health care industry toward their efforts to measure apparently unmeasurable student success outcomes such as critical thinking, problem-solving, and civic engagement. The experiences of health care providers, who have already developed methods to evaluate health care quality and patient outcomes, may be instructive to university leaders.

Upcoming Events

Early registration ends March 31, 2015 for the USU Summer Meeting, which will take place June 15-16 at Cleveland State University.

The Hispanic-Serving Health Professions Schools (HSHPS) are holding a professional development workshop aimed at junior faculty, post-doctoral students, and doctoral students interested in research careers that focus on Hispanic health disparities. The workshops will be held June 28-30 in Bethesda, MD.

Save the date for the Anchor Institutions Task Force (AITF) Annual Conference. The meeting will take place in New York City on October 29-30.

Publications and Resources

The Latino physician shortage has worsened over the past 30 years according to research published in Academic Medicine. At the national level, the number of Latino physicians per 100,000 people dropped from 135 to 105, and the same trend occurred within five states examined by the researchers. The authors recommend immediate action on the national and local level to increase the supply of Latino physicians.

Also in Academic Medicine, a survey finds that 30 percent of LGBT medical students reported hiding their sexual and gender identity due to persistent fear of discrimination. The researchers stressed the need for physicians to lead the way in fostering a higher level of diversity and inclusion in the field of medicine.

Two perspective pieces in the New England Journal of Medicine addressed the “White Coats for Black Lives” die-ins, the largest coordinated protests at US medical schools since the Vietnam War era. David Ansell and Edwin McDonald reflect on the impact of discrimination and systemic bias on health disparities. Mary Bassett, New York City’s health commissioner, highlights the lack of action to address issues of racism and health, and proposes three courses of action for health professionals: critical research, internal reform, and public advocacy.  

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2015-03-13T17:05:00+00:00
<![CDATA[A New Year’s Update from the Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/a-new-years-update-from-the-urban-universities-for-health-learning-collabor http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/a-new-years-update-from-the-urban-universities-for-health-learning-collabor#When:22:23:00Z

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Funding Opportunities

The Aetna Foundation has launched the Healthier World Innovation Challenge, which will fund projects intended to improve chronic disease outcomes in underserved communities using technology that is readily available. Up to $4.5 million will be awarded.  

The Disability Research and Dissemination Center (DRDC), in coordination with the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) at the CDC, is pleased to announce the availability of three new grant opportunities for 2015. The purpose of these opportunities is to evaluate the impact of various strategies for early identification of developmental disability. Awards range from $150,000 to $350,000 for up to 1 year. Applications are due February 27, 2014.

There are two upcoming grant opportunities for health professions students.  First, the National Health Service Corps released their 2015 Application and Program Guidance for the NHSC Loan Repayment Program.  Applications are due March 30, 2015.  Second, the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR) is accepting applications for the 2015 Paul Ambrose Scholars Program, which exposes health professions students to influential public health professionals and prepares them to be leaders in addressing population health challenges at the national and community level. Applications are due on March 31, 2015.

The NIH National Cancer Institute (NCI) is accepting applications for funding for the implementation of partnerships between institutions serving underserved health disparity populations and underrepresented students (ISUPS) and NCI-designated Cancer Centers (CC).  Applications are due April 1, 2015.

Also from NIH, the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Enhancing Diversity in Biomedical Data Science (R25) supports educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research workforce. Institutions must collaborate with at least one NIH BD2K Center.  Letters of intent are due on March 7, 2015.

Finally, Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) have the opportunity to participate in a research project to benefit students with disabilities. Although this is not a grant opportunity, participants will be provided with software, accessible textbooks, training, and professional education free of charge.

News

The University of Missouri-Kansas City has been selected by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching for the foundation’s coveted Community Engagement Classification. Among the initiatives cited in UMKC’s successful application were the Heartland Health Network, which earned a $1 million federal grant to address health disparities in the African American community, and the School of Nursing and Health Sciences’ active engagement of community partners in the development of educational programs that meet community needs.

Cleveland State University made headlines this week for its positive economic impact on the Cleveland community.

The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) is proud to announce the launch of our new blog, Urban University.  The blog aims to disseminate the learning from USU initiatives, members and partners that advances our understanding of student success and the role of anchor institutions in the community. We welcome case studies, reports, guest posts, videos, interviews, infographics and other news on innovations happening at your institutions.

A new study finds that racial and ethnic health disparities have declined in some areas. According to the researchers, gaps in quality of hospital care received by black, Hispanic and white patients have narrowed for three ailments: pneumonia, heart attacks and heart failure.

Another new study found that health care professionals who work in teams make fewer diagnostic errors than professionals working alone.

A Health Affairs blog explores how Community Health Workers can reinvent health care delivery in the US.

What will it take to diversify medicine? A RWJF Human Capital blog discusses the “power of the pipeline.”

Should urban universities help their neighbors? This article tells the story of how the University of Chicago partnered with other community organizations to stabilize a local neighborhood decimated by the housing crisis.  

President Michael Rao of Virginia Commonwealth University has announced that undergraduate applicants with a high school GPA of 3.3 or higher will no longer be required to submit SAT scores.  Hundreds of colleges around the country have already dropped the SAT requirement.

Upcoming Events

AAMC, VHA and CHA are co-hosting a webinar on tools to help hospitals and their partners address community health needs and plan activities to improve community health. The webinar will be held Thursday, February 5, 3:00-4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. (Please note that registration is restricted to AAMC, VHA and CHA members only).

The 36th Annual Minority Health Conference, Reaching for the American Dream - Economic Mobility and Minority Health will be held February 27, 2015 in Chapel Hill, NC.

The Association for Community Health Improvement (ACHI) will hold its annual conference March 4-6 in Dallas, TX.  All community health, community benefit, population health and healthy community professionals are welcome to attend.

The 2015 Beyond Flexner conference will focus on the social mission of medical education, and will be held April 13-15 in Albuquerque, NM. Dr. Art Kaufman from the UNM Health Sciences Center will be co-chairing.

The American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) will hold their annual meeting on April 15-18 in Phoenix, AZ.  The theme is “Empowering Leaders Igniting Change.”

Publications and Resources

The Condition of Latinos in Education 2015 Factbook published by Excelencia in Education provides compelling data to counter common myths and misperceptions about Latino students, including English language proficiency, workforce participation, and college enrollment and graduation rates.

HRSA has just published data collected from 2010-2012 on the racial, ethnic, and gender diversity of U.S. health care occupations.

The Ohio State University has launched a new web portal, Public University Medicaid Partnerships, which provides resources for university systems (public and private), academic medical centers, state agencies, and independent healthcare organizations interested in developing or expanding university-state partnerships. 

AAMC is pleased to launch Public Health Pathways, a new web-based resource of public health training opportunities for learners across the medical education continuum. 

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2015-01-30T22:23:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Data, dashboards, and a new partnership]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/data-dashboards-and-a-new-partnership http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/data-dashboards-and-a-new-partnership#When:18:05:00Z

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From the National Program Office

Happy holidays from the Urban Universities for HEALTH National Program Office! Before you leave for break, check out what’s happening at our demonstration sites:

Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) and the Mercy Health system have announced an innovative partnership to address the region’s primary care needs while developing a diverse healthcare workforce dedicated to serving local communities. Through the new partnership, among the first of its kind between a health system and academic health center, Mercy Health will provide full-tuition scholarships to NEOMED students who qualify in exchange for their future service commitments to Mercy Health following residency training.

The University of Missouri-Kansas City conducted a seminar earlier this month on how its health sciences schools are working together to promote and implement interprofessional education. UMKC is also pleased to report that more than 100 middle and high school students enrolled this year in their Saturday Academy, a seven-month enrichment program focused on math and science as well as ACT prep. A new element this year is a health care component in which professionals talk to the students about their particular area of health care.

Dr. Justin Perry from the Cleveland State University team was featured in the CSU ENGAGED blog for his leadership with “Making My Future Work,” a pilot project to promote college and career readiness among urban youth.

Our national study on holistic admissions in the health professions continues to receive media coverage and citations, including articles this month in Dr. Bicuspid and DentistryIQ .

Funding Opportunities

The NIH has posted a number of funding opportunities related to diversity and health disparities over the past few weeks, including: 1) funding to conduct health disparities-related meetings, workshops, and symposia – applications are due December 29; 2) supplemental funding to support research experiences for early career physicians and medical students from underrepresented backgrounds; 3) funding for research that targets reduction of health disparities among children; and 4) support for research on health promoting behaviors among minority males.

In addition, NIH “K Award” applications are due January 12, for National Cancer Institute mentored research scientists (K01 and K08) and scientists with patient-oriented research careers.

The American Medical Association has announced their Minority Scholars Award, which provides tuition assistance scholarships to underrepresented minority students. Medical schools may nominate up to two students. All nominations are due by March 6, 2015 at 5pm CST.

News

The number of medical schools with student-run free clinics has more than doubled, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Medical students volunteering in these settings reported that student-run free clinics provide valuable services to the underserved and enrich students’ educational experiences. However, they are challenged to obtain sufficient faculty staffing and funding.

The way physicians treat patients in medical settings may be contributing to racial disparities in mental health care, according to a new study in Health Services Research. Among the findings: Asian-Americans reported that they were less likely to be asked about mental health issues than non-Hispanic whites, and blacks were less likely to receive medication recommendations for mental health or substance abuse problems.  A related article noted that patients with mental illness typically do not receive the same quality of care, and that stigma surrounding mental illness may be responsible for the dearth of interest in psychiatry residencies.

A new report finds that minority students are studying public health in growing numbers, and that the public health workforce overall is more diverse than other health professions. The authors hypothesize that minorities may be more interested in public health because they have a personal connection with it, recognizing opportunities to return to their communities and make a difference.

In Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, Dr. Valerie Purdie-Vaughns from Columbia University describes how targeted classroom interventions can help eliminate stereotype threat among African-American students and close achievement gaps. Stereotype threat is a phenomenon among individuals that internalize feelings of inadequacy linked to negative stereotypes about groups they are identified with and subsequently live up to such stereotypes, leading to academic underperformance in a classroom setting.

An article in The Washington Post explores why medical schools should teach human rights, arguing that doing so is critical to producing doctors who can care for all patients in our increasingly diverse nation.

Jon Boeckenstedt argues in the Chronicle of Higher Education that the admissions office, rather than being part of the solution to college access issues, is actually making itself part of the problem “by creating a game that is heavily skewed in favor of students from high-income, well-educated families.”

Finally, a joint op-ed by USU presidents Michael Crow of Arizona State University and Mark Becker of Georgia State University was published in CNN. The op-ed highlighted disparities in higher education attainment, especially among low-income students and students of color, and ended with a call to action for universities to work together to create more opportunities for students and build a stronger society.

Upcoming Events

Save the date: The AAMC and CDC will hold an informal, interactive webinar about available resources and tools for conducting Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNAs), including a toolkit to be released in 2015. The webinar will take place on February 5, 2015, from 3:00-4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Additional information is forthcoming.

For those who wish to register early and save, the “early bird” registration fee is now available for the 2015 APLU Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, IN. The reduced rate will be available until January 19, 2015.

Publications and Resources

National data on characteristics of the registered nurse workforce is now available on a quarterly basis from the Center for Interdisciplinary Health Workforce Studies at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

These data originate from three federal surveys, and have been compiled to analyze trends related to age, gender, wages, race and ethnicity, educational preparation, full- and part-time employment, and other characteristics of the RN workforce across both hospital and non-hospital settings.

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio has released a dashboard designed to track Ohio’s progress toward improving health care value, specifically the relationship between health outcomes and health costs.

An AAMC Analysis in Brief explores how member hospitals are conducting community health needs assessments and engaging with their communities to improve health.

An article in Academic Medicine reviews the breadth of changes to medical education with an eye to the future, including learning and the learning environment, competency and assessment, workforce issues, admissions, and wellness.

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2014-12-19T18:05:00+00:00
<![CDATA[News from our demonstration sites, resources for LGBT-competent care, and more]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/news-from-our-demonstration-sites-resources-for-lgbt-competent-care-and-mor http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/news-from-our-demonstration-sites-resources-for-lgbt-competent-care-and-mor#When:17:13:00Z

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From the National Program Office

As the year draws to a close, the Learning Collaborative is focused on publishing some of our findings to date, including a vetted list of community health priorities (expected January 2015), an infographic on how to establish a university’s Geographic Scope of Impact (GSI), and additional publications related to the study on holistic admissions.

Our demonstration sites continue to make headlines:

The University of New Mexico completed an assessment of their region’s behavioral health resources, finding that “the community would achieve better access and mental health outcomes by developing intermediate- and community-based levels of care, rather than building additional inpatient acute care capacity.” UNM also participated on a Health Care Work Force Task Force which reported to the New Mexico State Legislature, requesting recurring funding for at least nine additional physician residency slots. A certificate program for community health workers will also start up this spring in partnership with local community colleges.

President Ronald M. Berkman from Cleveland State University appeared on CNN Newsroom last month to discuss college affordability and to share information about the University’s Graduation Incentive Plan, which provides students with a 2 percent tuition rebate and $200 stipend for textbooks if they complete 30 credits per year in good academic standing.

The University of Cincinnati College of Nursing was recognized as an Apple Distinguished Program for 2014–16 for its iCoN Initiative, which creatively leverages iPads as a vehicle for teaching and learning.

Funding Opportunities

The Macy Faculty Scholars Program is inviting applications for their 2015 class of scholars. The program is designed to identify and nurture the careers of promising educational innovators in medicine and nursing.  Scholars will implement new educational innovations at their home institutions and participate in career development activities. Salary support of up to $100,000 per year for two years will be provided, among other benefits. Applications are due February 11, 2015.

NIH has announced a mentored career development award to promote faculty diversity in biomedical research. It is targeted toward researchers who study cardiovascular, pulmonary, and hematologic diseases and sleep disorders in the general and health disparities population.  Letters of intent are due January 18, 2015.

News

Affirmative action received new challenges last month as two lawsuits filed in federal courts sought to block Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from considering race in admissions. Both lawsuits were filed in reaction to the Supreme Court’s opinion last year in the Fisher case. A related article discussed the role of alleged discrimination against Asian American students in the lawsuits.

As colleges and universities continue to add chief diversity officers to their top administrative ranks, some have called for a set of professional standards to guide their work. The National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education recently released a list of Standards of Professional Practice for Chief Diversity Officers.

An article in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education describes how nurse practitioners are critical to reducing the nationwide primary care shortage. NPs are also becoming significant providers of primary health care in urban settings, particularly to older people and people with chronic illnesses. 

Dr. Karen Bankston, associate dean at the University of Cincinnati, wrote a compelling op-ed on the need to break down barriers preventing frank discussion of race in order to make progress toward eliminating racial health disparities.

What is the future for community health workers? Alan Weil explores two different paths forward for community health workers, concluding that “we should honor the wisdom and experience of CHWs as they define their future rather than assuming that they will be absorbed into a health care system that is only beginning to learn how to support people in their communities.”

A Health Affairs blog post described how philanthropy is a “game changer” in the fight to eliminate mental health disparities.

Upcoming Events

Learn how to use the National Equity Atlas, an online resource for data and policy ideas to build an equitable economy in your region, state, and nationwide, at a webinar hosted by PolicyLink. The webinar will take place on Tuesday, December 9 from 2:00-3:00 p.m. EST.

There are two great webinars happening next Thursday! An interprofessional webinar hosted by AACN will focus on how faculty and students are preparing for Ebola across the health professions (Thursday, December 11, 1:00-2:30 p.m. EST).  Directly after the Ebola webinar, you can log on to Building an LGBT Competent Health Workforce: Facilitators and Barriers, hosted by the AAMC (Thursday, December 11, 2:00-3:30 p.m. EST).

On Monday, December 15, 10:00-11:30 a.m. EST the Brookings Institution will hold a live webcast to share findings from a new book, Diversity Explosion, which explores how new racial demographics are remaking America. These include how the population of the United States is diversifying from the bottom up, where minorities are moving, the rise of racial integration, and the political impact of a diversifying electorate.

Save the date for the 2015 Health Datapalooza conference: May 31 – June 3, 2015 in Washington, DC.

Publications and Resources

The AAMC published a resource guide for implementing curricular and institutional climate changes to improve the quality of care for LGBT, DSD, and gender non-conforming patients. A related article in The Atlantic discussed the AAMC guidelines and the ongoing need to address social stigma and discrimination in the health care environment that leads to health disparities for LGBT patients.

Three new reports in Academic Medicine explore different aspects of students’ medical career choices. The first examines the impact of a physician shadowing program on undergraduate premedical students’ career choices, perceptions of careers in medicine, and medical career knowledge. A second report  finds that students from diverse backgrounds value diversity programs, and that investing in such programs can be of benefit to medical schools seeking more diverse and inclusive classes. Finally, a third article finds that students’ interest in family medicine may increase if family medicine role models are ubiquitous and if students become immersed in community-based family medicine preceptorships.

Last, but not least: what is population health? A Health Policy Institute of Ohio (HPIO) brief seeks to establish a definitive and comprehensive answer to that question.

 

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2014-12-03T17:13:00+00:00
<![CDATA[New funding opportunities, publications, and a network for health equity champions]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-funding-opportunities-publications-and-a-network-for-health-equity-cham http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/new-funding-opportunities-publications-and-a-network-for-health-equity-cham#When:16:00:00Z

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From the National Program Office

We are pleased to announce two new media publications related to the Urban Universities for HEALTH-led study, Holistic Admissions in the Health Professions. Dr. Santa J. Ono, President of the University of Cincinnati (UC), and Dr. Greer Glazer, Dean of the College of Nursing at UC, recently published a joint op-ed in the Huffington Post on the results of the study and implications for our health care system. Meanwhile, Dr. Marc Nivet, Chief Diversity Officer at AAMC and Dr. Jennifer Danek, Senior Director for Urban Universities for HEALTH, co-authored a blog entry in Wing of Zock on how holistic admission practices go beyond test scores to increase diversity.

Funding Opportunities

MedU invites letters of intent for medical education research, both qualitative and quantitative, in the areas of learning analytics, instructional design, and effectiveness studies. Proposals in these areas that best capitalize on MedU’s data and infrastructure will receive higher priority. Multi-institutional and cross-disciplinary studies are encouraged. Only MD, PhD, or EdD investigators are eligible to apply. The deadline to submit letters of intent is December 12, 2014.

The NIH and the EPA have partnered to fund Centers of Excellence on Environmental Health Disparities Research (P50), which will develop innovative approaches to understanding environmentally-driven health disparities and improve access to healthy environments for vulnerable populations and communities. A technical assistance webinar will be held on November 24, and applications are due January 9, 2015. The NIH has also announced The Short-Term Research Education Program to Increase Diversity in Health-Related Research (R25), which supports creative educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research workforce. Applications are due February 18, 2015.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the de Beaumont Foundation, Kresge Foundation, and The Advisory Board Company have announced the launch of the BUILD Health Challenge (Bold, Upstream, Integrated, Local and Data-driven). Together, the funding partners will award up to $3.5 million in grants and up to $4 million in low-interest loans and other program-related investments over two years to collaborations that promote community health and health equity.  To be eligible to apply, applicants must include at minimum the partnership of a hospital or health system, local health department, and nonprofit community-based organization, and focus on an urban neighborhood, zip code, or census tract experiencing severe health disparities.  The deadline to express interest is January 16, 2014.

News

The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals declined to rehear Fisher v. the University of Texas at Austin, effectively upholding a decision in the university's favor that was issued by a panel of the court's judges in July. The case could now be headed once again to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The AAMC’s Advisory Committee on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Sex Development published a new comprehensive resource guide for medical educators on how to provide better care for patients with diverse forms of gender identities, sexual orientations, and sex development histories. The release was covered by Slate and NPR; the latter also interviewed Dr. Scott Leibowitz, an assistant professor of child psychiatry at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, regarding his views on reforming the medical school curricula to address disparities in the care of LGBT patients.

Virginia Commonwealth University won APLU’s C. Peter Magrath University Community Engagement Award for their Working Together to Transform Lives through Pharmacist Collaborative Care and Outreach in the Community (PCOC) program. The PCOC program partners with underserved clinics and senior living facilities to provide community-based clinical training experiences for pharmacy students that will help them better understand the needs of underserved populations, including the uninsured, older adults, homeless individuals, and those living in rural areas. 

The University of Texas System has unveiled a competency-based medical sciences education program that employs personalized learning strategies. The first program to enroll students will be a bachelor’s degree program in biomedical sciences at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; other certificate, undergraduate, and graduate programs are planned.

The White House has released a new report, Women and Girls of Color: Addressing Challenges and Expanding Opportunity that highlights work the Administration has done over the last six years to reduce barriers to success for everyone, including women and girls of color. Read the full report.

A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that fast-food chains disproportionately target black children through child-oriented marketing, further contributing to and perpetuating existing disparities in obesity.

Upcoming Events

The 2014 Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) Grantees' Conference will convene on December 1-3, 2014 in National Harbor, MD. The theme is “Transdisciplinary Collaborations: Evolving Dimensions of US and Global Health Equity.” Although the conference will primarily highlight research from the programs supported by NIMHD, all who are engaged in clinical, translational, basic science, education, and policy research in minority health and health disparities are invited to attend.

The American Hospital Association will hold a webinar, University Hospitals’ Journey to Increase Diversity in Leadership and Reduce Health Care Disparities, on December 16, 2014, from 2:30-3:30 p.m. Eastern Time. The webinar will feature University Hospitals and its many programs that have helped the health system increase diversity in its leadership and governance and reduce disparities in health care.

The AAMC has issued a call for abstracts and submissions for the 11th Annual AAMC Health Workforce Research Conference.  Submissions are due by close of business on January 9, 2015.

Publications and Resources

AAMC released Diversity in the Physician Workforce: Facts & Figures 2014 via an interactive website. The report provides physicians, students, faculty, administrators, researchers, and policymakers with a compendium of detailed statistical information on the demographics and practice patterns of the physician workforce that graduated from U.S. M.D.-granting medical schools as well as trending information for select topics.

A new report by the AAMC and Academy Health finds substantial disparities in research aiming to eliminate health disparities. Knowledge gaps exist among populations studied, disorders studied, and geographic locations of the research activities.

The Health Equity Leadership and Exchange Network (HELEN), a collaborative effort between the National REACH Coalition, Morehouse School of Medicine, and the National Collaborative for Health Equity, officially launched earlier this fall.  HELEN will support the health equity movement by providing analysis and information on health policies and laws and their impact on health equity, a forum for health equity champions to share ideas, and a venue where advocates, scholars, and public health practitioners can connect.  HELEN membership is free and open to anyone interested in health equity and health policy work. 

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2014-11-17T16:00:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Nine USU institutions funded by NIH “BUILD” program]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/nine-usu-institutions-funded-by-nih-build-program http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/nine-usu-institutions-funded-by-nih-build-program#When:19:07:00Z

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From the National Program Office

We are pleased to share the news that Urban Universities for HEALTH was highlighted in an article by Diverse: Issues in Higher EducationPipeline programs from the University of New Mexico and the University of Cincinnati were featured. 
 
Our colleagues at AAMC and APLU are preparing for upcoming Annual Meetings: the APLU Annual Meeting will be November 2-4 in Orlando, FL, and the AAMC Annual Meeting will be held November 7-11 in Chicago, IL.  At the APLU meeting, we will hold health-related sessions on the use of holistic admissions in the health professions, and faculty cluster hiring as a tool for increasing diversity, improving institutional climate, and stimulating research on health disparities topics.  Summaries of these sessions are forthcoming after the meeting.
 
Finally, in case you missed it, Cleveland State University has published a great summary of our October Learning Collaborative meeting

Funding Opportunities

The NIMHD encourages institutions that are eligible to apply for support through the NIH Academic Research Enhancement Awards (AREA) program to submit applications for innovative research projects focused on minority health and health disparities. This initiative also seeks to stimulate interest in health disparities research careers among undergraduate students through hands-on participation in original research. Letters of intent are due December 12, 2014.
 
Publication Opportunity: Group Processes and Intergroup Relations is seeking manuscript submissions with an explicit focus on health disparities, including related concepts such as minority health and research addressing health equity. Articles for this special issue should be submitted no later than May 1, 2015. Manuscripts should be submitted using the regular GPIR online system, specifying that the submission be for the special issue on Health Disparities.

News

The NIH has announced the award of approximately $31 million in funding to enhance diversity in the biomedical research workforce.  Five USU institutions were primary recipients of grants through the Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce program: California State University, Long Beach; California State University, Northridge, Portland State University, Morgan State University, and San Francisco State University. Four other USU schools, Arizona State University, the University of Minnesota, the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, and Wayne State University, received funding as partnering institutions.
 
SUNY Downstate Medical Center announced a new $750,000 initiative targeting urban health disparities and inequities. The President’s Health Disparities Research Fund (HDRF) will focus initially on three areas: 1) fostering research and partnerships that will target the medical and social priorities of the patient base, 2) leveraging campus assets to build collaborations and partnerships with the community for innovative research, and 3) expanding research capacity to enhance Downstate’s role as a lead in collaborative centers for clinical, public health or basic research.
 
In addition, University Hospital of Brooklyn (at SUNY Downstate Medical Center) has been awarded the 2014 Press Ganey Award for Commitment to Excellence for Continuous Improvement in Patient Satisfaction. Only 20 organizations out of the more than 10,000 healthcare facilities that partner with Press Ganey win the award each year, and Downstate is the only academic medical center being recognized in the Commitment to Excellence category.
 
Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) and Cleveland State University (CSU) announced the launch of the RN-to-BSN Nursing Continuum, a program designed to provide a smooth transition from Tri-C’s associate degree program to earning a bachelor’s degree at CSU.

The American Medical Association (AMA) introduced a first-of-its-kind resource aimed at helping physicians and other health care providers improve patient access to care. The AMA's Health Workforce Mapper is an interactive tool that illustrates the geographic locations of the health care workforce in each state, including health professional shortage areas, hospital locations, and other related workforce trends.

The media continues to cover the release of findings from the National Study on University Admissions in the Health Professions, conducted by Urban Universities for HEALTH with leadership from the University of Cincinnati. The latest article builds upon the study’s results and discusses how UC is using holistic review to increase diversity at the College of Nursing.
 
Why do so few black men earn STEM degrees?  A series of recent articles from the Chronicle of Higher Education explored challenges surrounding the need to increase participation of African American males in STEM career fields.  Some educators and policymakers say it’s essential to stop fixating on negative data and start telling the stories of black success. However, the authors of a Chronicle op-ed cautioned that the increased focus on educational attainment of African American males ignores the multiple ways in which black girls and women are also marginalized, and that “Black women routinely fall between the cracks of reports on black men and reports on women.”
 
The journal Health Affairs reported that Medicaid, which is often criticized, is actually very popular with its customers, who rate it as “equal to or better” than private coverage. Also related to national health care reform: a new study conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that 89 percent of Americans surveyed were unaware that open enrollment begins in November, or any time soon.

Upcoming Events

On Tuesday, November 4, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. EST, The American Hospital Association wil hold a webinar entitled Integrating Equity and Quality: Implementing Improvement Projects to Address Health Care Disparities.

The AAMC’s Advancing Holistic Review Initiative will hold a webinar, Mapping Your Route: Navigating a Dynamic Policy and Legal Environment in Admissions and Enrollment, on Wednesday, November 19, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. EST.

Publications and Resources

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM) has just announced the release of the November 2014 Supplement, The Public Health Workforce. Through the AAMC-CDC Cooperative Agreement, Public Health and Community Medicine Instruction and Physician Practice Location, authored by Imam Xierali et. al., examines the association between medical students' perception of their public health and community medicine instruction and practice location in a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA).
 
An AAMC Analysis in Brief  focuses on how interprofessional educational opportunities affect medical students’ understanding of the collaborative care of patients.
 
This interactive table shows the race, ethnicity, and gender of 20,642,572 students enrolled at 4,725 colleges and universities in the fall of 2012, the latest year for which figures are available.
 
The Alliance for a Just Society has published a new report on racial disparities in women’s health outcomes.

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.

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2014-10-31T19:07:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Learning Collaborative releases new findings, makes progress toward dashboard of workforce measures]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-releases-new-findings-makes-progress-toward-dashboar http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-releases-new-findings-makes-progress-toward-dashboar#When:20:34:00Z

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From the National Program Office

The Learning Collaborative traveled to Cleveland State University last week for its semi-annual conference and site visit, aimed at examining evidence-based approaches to reducing health care disparities. The goal of the two-day event was to develop an agreed-upon set of leading health workforce measures to include in a metrics dashboard – one of the primary deliverables of the Urban Universities for HEALTH project. The meeting featured three dynamic “unconference,” or participant-led, discussion sessions around metrics development within each of the core areas of impact. CSU/NEOMED presented highlights from its pipeline and service learning programs, and students and members of the Cleveland community shared their experiences with the group. Participants left the meeting having learned more about metrics that other institutions had developed, and made progress toward identifying the best indicators for a metrics dashboard. A summary of those metrics and lessons learned is forthcoming.
 
On September 30, Urban Universities for HEALTH released the results of the National Study on University Admissions in the Health Professions. Dr. Greer Glazer, Associate Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, led the study, which found that health professions schools report an overall positive impact from the use of holistic review – a university admissions process that assesses an applicant’s unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores. The study also found that a majority of schools report an increase in the diversity of their incoming classes and no change to measures of academic quality, student academic performance, or student retention. The results were released at a press conference in Washington, DC. Watch video from the event or download the report.

Funding Opportunities

The AcademyHealth and the Aetna Foundation announce a call for applications for the new AcademyHealth/Aetna Foundation Scholars in Residence Fellowship Program. This fellowship is designed to retain underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities in health services research by providing professional training and networking activities for junior and mid-career level academics and clinical practitioners, who are conducting disparities research with a focus on population health. The application deadline is November 7, 2014

The AAMC is offering a Clinical Care Innovation Challenge Award that recognizes improvements at member institutions in improved clinical care delivery, payment, or training models. Awards of $10,000 each will be given to support one-year pilot implementation projects. Applications are due November 24.

The NIH has posted an FOA to solicit innovative system-level health services and policy research that can directly and demonstrably contribute to the elimination of health disparities.  Direct costs are limited to $350,000 per year for up to five years.  Letters of intent are due December 20, 2014.

News

SUNY Downstate Medical Center has received the prestigious 2014 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) award, which recognizes an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion, from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. In addition, Kevin Antoine, assistant vice president for diversity and inclusion at SUNY Downstate, has been recognized with the magazine’s 2014 Diversity Visionary Award, the only individual honor of its kind nationally. 
 
Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) was recently awarded renewed state AmeriCorps grant funding from ServeOhio that will support 10 full-time positions and 20 part-time positions to create a focused group of volunteers devoted to advancing the health and success of rural Ohio communities.

The Office for Diversity at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC) has initiated a Mentorship Research Pilot Project for HSC faculty. The Achieving Institutional Mentoring Excellence (A.I.M.E) Pilot Project seeks to develop more effective faculty interactions and collaborations among both mentees and mentors by implementing a curriculum featuring psychosocial dimensions of academic life including identity, implicit bias, career decision-making, cross-cultural communication, and other related professional development topics with an emphasis on the promotion and tenure system. UNM HSC is also collaborating with Sandia National Laboratories to plan for future workforce needs by using a system dynamic modeling of primary care practitioners.  Finally, New Mexico has begun a community health worker (CHW) certification program in which the Office for Community Health at the UNM HSC has been instrumental in developing guidelines and training material.
 
Nursing, pharmacy, psychology and social work students at the University of Missouri-Kansas City will get special training on how to best serve veterans – including those with post-traumatic stress disorder – under a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).
 
A perspective piece published by the New England Journal of Medicine describes ongoing challenges in the quest to diversify the physician workforce. John Iglehart notes that fewer underrepresented minority students than white students apply for, are accepted by, and graduate from medical schools. One development that may ultimately expand the diversity of the physician workforce is the impending demographic tsunami. However, these changes alone cannot resolve the diversity challenges facing black Americans and U.S. society.

When is a student “first-generation?” First-generation status is one of higher education’s main markers of student disadvantage, along with Pell Grant eligibility and membership in an underrepresented minority group. Despite the importance of the designation, however, there is no universal definition of what it means.  This Chronicle of Higher Education article explores some of the definitions in use and how universities might better classify and measure first-generation students entering their institutions.

Upcoming Events

The webinar Tools to Integrate Equity into Community Health Needs Assessments will highlight two analytical resources for conducting Community Health Needs Assessments with a health equity lens: the America’s Health Rankings’ ‘Health Disparity Tool’ and NNPHI’s ‘Community Commons.’ The webinar is scheduled for Thursday, October 23, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Eastern Time. 

Publications and Resources

The AAMC has released two Analysis in Brief publications on the racial and ethnic composition of the physician workforce. The first focuses on physician specialties; the second focuses on geographic distribution.
 
The AAMC has also published a second edition of Roadmap to Diversity and Educational Excellence: Key Legal and Educational Policy Foundations for Medical Schools. The publication offers guidance on the legal and policy fundamentals for developing and evaluating sustainable, mission-driven, diversity-related policies and practices in medical school admissions.
 
A new paper published jointly by the AAMC and AcademyHealth, The State of Health Equity Research: Closing Knowledge Gaps to Address Inequities, analyzes all U.S.-based, health disparities-focused health services research (HSR) funded between 2007 and 2011. More than 2,000 abstracts were analyzed to describe the funders and funding recipients of health disparities-focused HSR, to identify gaps in the populations and outcomes studied, and to examine five-year trends in the “evolution” of disparities research from documenting inequities, to investigating causal mechanisms, to identifying solutions.

A special issue of Nature explores connections between diversity and the rigor of research — including how marginalization affects study design — and discusses persistent, misguided assumptions. The message is clear: inclusive science is better science.

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.
 

 

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2014-10-17T20:34:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Learning Collaborative advances toward dashboard of key health workforce measures]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-advances-toward-dashboard-of-key-health-workforce-me http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-advances-toward-dashboard-of-key-health-workforce-me#When:19:25:00Z

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Cleveland, OH - The Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative traveled to Cleveland State University last week for its semi-annual conference and site visit, aimed at examining evidence-based approaches to reducing health care disparities. The goal of the two-day event was to develop an agreed-upon set of leading health workforce measures to include in a metrics dashboard – one of the primary deliverables of the Urban Universities for HEALTH project.

Dr. Ronald M. Berkman, President of Cleveland State University, and Dr. Jay Gershen, President of Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), opened the meeting with remarks highlighting the NEOMED-CSU Partnership for Urban Health. The NEOMED-CSU Partnership for Urban Health seeks to improve health outcomes for residents of traditionally underserved urban communities and reduce health disparities. The partnership has also developed the place-based Cleveland Neighborhood Model, which sends interdisciplinary teams of health professions students to local communities to promote the health of communities residents and their families.

The Learning Collaborative then commenced a series of three “unconference” sessions, which took place over the next two days and were designed to elicit key leading health workforce indicators within each of the core areas of impact (access to health care, educational opportunity, and competence).  Unlike regular conference sessions, unconference sessions are participant-driven and feature open discussion.  Leading indicators predict future events and tend to change ahead of that event, while lagging indicators follow an event and measure whether or not it was successful.  The charge of the group was to develop leading indicators that could eventually be included in a metrics dashboard for universities.The dashboard, once fully operational, will allow universities to better predict outcomes related to students, the institution, and the community, and help leaders transition to more proactive and evidence-based decision making.

Two dynamic keynote speakers reminded the Learning Collaborative why health equity work is so important, and inspired the group to further engage with communities to support disadvantaged student’s success in the health professions.  Dr. Julian M. Earls, Executive in Residence at CSU’s Nance College of Business Administration gave an empowering speech, arguing that “we need ‘I can,’ not just IQ,” and “nothing in this world will take the place of persistence.”  Dr. Akram Boutros, President and CEO of Cleveland’s MetroHealth system, spoke about the lack of inclusion in the health care environment: “Minorities do not have confidence in our health care system, because we have not embraced them.” Instead of “cultural sensitivity,” he argued, “let’s try being sensitive to other people.”

A key strength of the conference was the opportunity to learn more about CSU/NEOMED’s programs and interact with students and community members who had set aside time to join the meeting and share their perspectives.  For example, a group of students participating in the Health Professions Affinity Community (HPAC) program presented information about community-based projects they had developed.  These projects spanned a wide range of health issues and employed creative solutions, such as peer-to-peer teen suicide prevention, a program to recruit nurses for K-12 schools that currently lack a school nurse, and a “dress for success” program to help disadvantaged students learn how to dress professionally for jobs and internships.

The meeting culminated in a “Data Innovation Challenge,” which allowed representatives from several demonstration sites to pitch new ideas and initiatives related to metrics development and data collection.

Participants left the meeting having learned more about metrics that other institutions had developed, and made progress toward identifying the best indicators for a metrics dashboard.  The Learning Collaborative will begin identifying institutional strategies that will impact these metrics and ultimately move the dial toward reducing health disparities in urban communities.

Further reading:

Urban Universities for HEALTH brings national conference to CSU


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2014-10-17T19:25:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Health Equity, Educational Opportunity, and Workforce Development Highlighted at Press Event]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/health-equity-access-to-education-and-health-workforce-development-highligh http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/health-equity-access-to-education-and-health-workforce-development-highligh#When:19:07:00Z

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Washington, DC - Earlier this week, Urban Universities for HEALTH held a press conference to release the results of the National Study on University Admissions in the Health Professions.  Dr. Greer Glazer, Associate Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing presented the results to a packed audience at the National Press Club’s First Amendment Lounge in Washington, DC.  Dr. M. Roy Wilson, President of Wayne State University, then led a panel of higher education and health leaders in discussion of the findings and their impact on universities, students, and the future health workforce.

“The ultimate goal here is to have the best workforce possible, a workforce that understands the needs of the community, and a workforce that will ultimately be sensitive enough that we can have better health outcomes for minority populations and those that are underserved,” said Dr. Yvonne Maddox, Acting Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) at the National Institutes of Health, which funded the study. “When the workforce is diverse and representative of community it serves, there is a patient trust element that comes into play, and ultimately we see patients in our communities get better treatment."

Dr. Darrell Kirch, president and CEO of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), reflected upon the implications of the study for the future physician workforce.  "There's so much more to being a good doctor than just your test scores,” he said.  "I wager that there is no one in this room who, when you meet your doctor, you ask them what their grade point average is. But you do notice their bedside manner. You do notice the way they communicate with you, and the way they relate to you."

The Temple Option, an test-score optional admissions pathway for students applying to Temple University, is another strategy related to holistic review that is designed to expand access to higher education for disadvantaged students. "We received 12,000 applicants for 200 slots this year,” said Dr. Neil D. Theobald, president of Temple University. “If we're going to be open to students from all backgrounds – and that is our mission – we're going to need to look at other ways to gather data than simply looking at their board scores."

The event was webcast to more than 500 individual viewers spanning several hundred U.S. cities as well as 7 foreign countries. The study and press event were covered by multiple news outlets, including the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed

 

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2014-10-01T19:07:00+00:00
<![CDATA[New National Study Finds Holistic Admission Has Positive Impact on Class Diversity]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/press-release-new-national-study-finds-holistic-admission-has-positive-impa http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/press-release-new-national-study-finds-holistic-admission-has-positive-impa#When:00:01:00Z

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WASHINGTON, DC (September 30, 2014)— A new national study finds that health professions schools report an overall positive impact from the use of holistic review – a university admissions process that assesses an applicant’s unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores. The report, Holistic Admissions in the Health Professions, released today is the first large-scale study to examine the prevalence and effectiveness of holistic review across multiple health disciplines at universities nationwide.

The national survey coordinated by Urban Universities for HEALTH – a collaboration between the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), with funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) – finds the majority of schools report an increase in the diversity of their incoming classes and no change to measures of academic quality, student academic performance, or student retention. Half of schools surveyed reported that the average GPA of the incoming class remained unchanged, while 40 percent reported that it increased. (To read the full report go to: http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/knowledge-base/publications)

“Our study shows that holistic review is a very promising admissions practice that not only increased access for diverse students but also admitted students who excelled academically and have the right qualities to be successful in the workforce,” said Dr. Greer Glazer, Dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, who led the study.

Many colleges and universities use a holistic admission process to select students. The practice has become more popular in health fields such as medicine, because it enables schools to evaluate a broader range of criteria important for student success, and to select individuals with the background and skills needed to meet the demands of a transforming health care environment.

“Being a good health professional is about more than scientific knowledge.  It also requires an understanding of people.  Holistic review helps schools find students who have the attributes and abilities to become outstanding humanistic health professionals and leaders in their field,” said Darrell Kirch, M.D., president and CEO of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). “It is gratifying to see holistic review being used by so many institutions to recruit the kind of health providers you and I would want at our bedside. Furthermore, it’s heartening to see that these admission practices are showing signs of improving academic success, diversity, and other outcomes we want to encourage in the health professions.”

“What we found is that universities can expand access to higher education for disadvantaged students while maintaining or improving academic standards,” said. Peter McPherson, President of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU). “This is exciting news for us, because our universities are looking for ways to help students from all backgrounds succeed, and we hope that our health profession schools in particular will use this evidence to recruit and train a health workforce that meets community and employer needs.”

About the Study Method

Data were collected through an electronic survey that was sent to the presidents of 163 universities. A total of 104 universities from 45 different states participated in the study with 228 individual health professions schools (nursing, medicine, dentistry, public health, and pharmacy) providing their data on practices and outcomes. Survey respondents self-reported their use of holistic review, but they also reported their schools’ actual admissions practices. Actual practices were held up against a theoretical model for holistic admissions in order to objectively assess the extent to which schools have a holistic admission process.

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About Urban Universities for HEALTH

Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership and Transformation of the Health Workforce) is a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The project aims to improve evidence and the use of data that will help universities enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse and prepared health workforce that will improve health and health equity in underserved urban communities.

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2014-09-30T00:01:00+00:00
<![CDATA[National Study on University Admissions in the Health Professions to be released September 30th]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/national-study-on-university-admissions-in-the-health-professions-to-be-rel http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/national-study-on-university-admissions-in-the-health-professions-to-be-rel#When:20:43:00Z

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On September 30, 2014, in Washington, DC, Urban Universities for HEALTH will release a report that is the first to examine nationwide the impact and use of holistic review—a university admissions process that assesses an applicant’s unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores—for students pursuing careers in the health professions.

Many colleges and universities use a holistic admission process to select students. The practice has become more popular in health fields such as medicine, because it enables schools to evaluate a broader range of criteria important for student success, and to select individuals with the background and skills needed to meet the demands of a transforming health care environment. However, the extent to which this admissions practice was being used across schools of other health professions nationwide and the impact it’s had on academic success, diversity, and other outcomes—such as students’ engagement with the community—were largely unknown until now.

The National Study on University Admissions in the Health Professions was led by Dr. Greer Glazer, Dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, and coordinated by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU)/Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU), with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

At the event, researchers and higher education leaders will discuss key findings from the study and the impact of the holistic review process.

When:   9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Where:  National Press Club, First Amendment Lounge (529 14th St NW, 13th Floor, Washington, DC)

RSVP:  Register for the in-person event in Washington  or  Register for the live webcast

Contact: Julia Michaels, Urban Universities for HEALTH

Continental breakfast will be provided.

Scheduled speakers include:

 

  • Dr. Darrell G. Kirch, President and CEO, Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)
  • Dr. M. Roy Wilson, President, Wayne State University
  • Dr. Neil D. Theobald, President, Temple University
  • Dr. Yvonne Maddox, Acting Director, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
  • Dr. Greer Glazer, Co-Principal Investigator and Dean, College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati

 

Join the discussion on Twitter with @UUHEALTH and follow #HolisticReview

 

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Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership, and Transformation of the Health Workforce) is a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) with the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The project aims to improve evidence and the use of data that will help universities enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse and prepared health workforce that will improve health and health equity in underserved urban communities.

 

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2014-09-23T20:43:00+00:00
<![CDATA[NEOMED Receives Renewed AmeriCorps Funding for Service-Learning, Community Health Improvement]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/neomed-receives-renewed-americorps-funding-for-service-learning-community-h http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/neomed-receives-renewed-americorps-funding-for-service-learning-community-h#When:19:40:00Z

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Rootstown, Ohio - Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) was recently awarded renewed state AmeriCorps grant funding from ServeOhio that will support 10 full-time positions and 20 part-time positions to create a focused group of volunteers devoted to advancing the health and success of rural Ohio communities beginning in August. Year two of the three-year grant through ServeOhio, the state's governor-appointed commission on service and volunteerism, was approved to increase the number of AmeriCorps members from 20 to 30.  The increase in AmeriCorps members will allow for an increased outreach to Ohio school districts.  The grant award will total $798,000 with a portion of the ServeOhio investment matched by NEOMED.

Additionally, over $335,000 in scholarship money will be made available to AmeriCorps members through the Segal AmeriCorps Education Award to use to pay existing student loans or advance their aspirations in a health-related career.

NEOMED-based AmeriCorps members develop and deliver a program that addresses health care workforce needs in communities, including rural primary care tracks, following the model of NEOMED's Health Professions Affinity Community (HPAC) initiative. The HPAC program is being implemented under NEOMED's leadership as part of its larger community engagement initiative to support and guide high school students with an interest in pursuing a health professions career, empowering them to develop sustainable programs that make a difference in the health of their communities.

The 30 AmeriCorps members will implement an HPAC service learning curriculum that helps students to identify pressing health concerns in their community through self-directed learning, seek and obtain resources from within their community, and combine resources and learning to formulate health improvement programs while advancing themselves toward health care careers. The HPAC curriculum will be offered through local high schools and increasingly in higher education institutions in identified regions throughout Ohio.

This project is a lead initiative of the Ohio Alliance, which is a state-based consortium organization of the national Sullivan Alliance to Transform America's Health Professions. Based out of NEOMED, the Ohio Alliance coordinates the efforts of multiple partners across the state to advance the health and economic vitality of Ohio through health professions training pathways. The goal of the Ohio Alliance is to enhance the capacity of its partners to prepare an academically competent, diverse health care workforce, committed to promoting community health and economic development in Ohio.

Northeast Ohio Medical University is a community-based, public medical university with a mission to improve the quality of health care in Northeast Ohio working in collaboration with its educational and clinical partners. With a focus on scientific and medical research, and the interprofessional training of health professionals that is unique to the state of Ohio, the University offers a doctor of medicine (M.D.) and a doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, in addition to graduate-level coursework and research opportunities leading to master's and doctoral degrees in other medical areas. Northeast Ohio Medical University is a founding member of the Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron. Visit www.neomed.edu.

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2014-09-03T19:40:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Upcoming meetings and the latest diversity research]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/upcoming-meetings-and-the-latest-diversity-research http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/upcoming-meetings-and-the-latest-diversity-research#When:10:00:00Z

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From the National Program Office

As we prepare to move to the next phase of our project, demonstration site teams are reflecting upon what they’ve learned about measuring their institutions’ progress toward health workforce goals and the university’s impact on top community health priorities. We will convene again as a full Learning Collaborative on October 6-7 in Cleveland to share our progress and move forward with some of the collaborative projects that have emerged among demonstration sites.

For those planning to attend either the APLU Annual Meeting (November 2-4 in Orlando, FL) or the AAMC Annual Meeting (November 7-11 in Chicago, IL), registration is ongoing – reserve your spot today!

Funding Opportunities

The NIH has announced the Clinician Scientist Mentoring Award to Promote Workforce Diversity, which provides support to mid-career health-professional doctorates or equivalent for basic, epidemiological or outcomes research, and to act as research mentors to early-stage investigators from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral research. Applications are due November 24.

News

Last month, we shared the news that Dr. Karen Bankston and Dr. Barb Tobias from the University of Cincinnati went on the air for a local radio station to talk about health workforce diversity.  An audio recording of their interview is now online

A new agreement between San Juan College and the University of New Mexico will allow the 2-year institution’s students to graduate with a 4-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree from UNM without leaving the San Juan College campus, starting in January 2015.

A survey by the National Association for College Admission Counseling shows that colleges struggle with diversity issues within admissions offices, where white males seem to lead a field that -- at the entry-level ranks -- is more diverse. The survey results were covered by Diverse, Inside Higher Ed and the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Researchers at Florida State and Vanderbilt found that graduation rates for black and Latino students are comparable to those of white students when controlling for factors such as student educational background and institutional resources.

Professors from the Center for Health Services Research at UNC have developed a new online tool, the FutureDocs Forecasting Tool, which will allow health care providers and anyone interested to identify fluctuations in projected availability of physicians and specialists in the near future.

In policy news, U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin has introduced legislation, the Veterans Affairs Health Workforce Enhancement Act, which she says will help address the physician shortage within the VA. The bill would increase the number of VA Graduate Medical Education positions in needed specialties, including primary care and mental health, at VA facilities facing a physician shortage by 2,000 positions over five years.

Upcoming Events

Having trouble explaining health equity to the media? The Health Equity Initiative (HEI) is offering a brief workshop on how to do exactly that on Wednesday, September 10, from 12:00-2:00PM Eastern Time.

The American Public Health Association’s annual conference will be held November 15-19 in New Orleans, LA. Click here to register at early-bird rates.

Publications and Resources

A new publication by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation compares the U.S. public policy approach to tackling the problem of health disparities with the European approach.

Another Robert Wood Johnson Foundation publication shares lessons learned from the Aligning Forces for Quality Initiative, and what’s working well to reduce disparities in care. Better Health Greater Cleveland was highlighted as a success story.

An article entitled “Improving Patient Safety Systems for Patients With Limited English Proficiency: A Guide for Hospitals”, highlights some of the challenges of providing Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) to patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP), and how hospitals can take action. For additional context, check out a related article in the New England Journal of Medicine on “advancing health with CLAS.”

The Commonwealth Fund has published a state policy framework for integrating health and social services.

A toolkit from the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) is intended to help academics build better research partnerships with community health centers.

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.

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2014-08-08T10:00:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Summer meeting outcomes, new data from UC, and a surprise research finding]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/summer-meeting-outcomes-new-data-from-uc-and-a-surprise-research-finding http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/summer-meeting-outcomes-new-data-from-uc-and-a-surprise-research-finding#When:19:00:00Z

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From the National Program Office

The past few months have been busy and productive for the Learning Collaborative. We held our summer meeting in conjunction with the USU annual meeting on June 23-24. The first day was devoted to our emerging efforts in nursing; we convened more than 30 nursing deans to explore new strategies for universities to improve the diversity and competence of future nurses. Highlights included a discussion on accelerated, competency-based BSN programs for veterans with prior field health experience, and a discussion of promising admission practices for increasing diversity, including holistic admission.  
 
Demonstration site teams joined us for a health session with USU presidents and chancellors, in which we shared some of our accomplishments from the past year, as well as areas where we are continuing to collect data and improve evidence. Presidents and chancellors participated in a robust discussion around the various ways that universities can improve access to care, improve educational opportunities for students, and increase the capacity of future health professionals to address the social determinants of health.  Photos from both events are available on our Facebook page.
 

Funding Opportunities

NIMHD is soliciting innovative social, behavioral, health services, and policy research that can directly contribute to the elimination of health disparities. Letters of intent are due July 28 with the full application due August 28, 2014.
 
NIH will fund a new data coordinating center for multidisciplinary and collaborative research on oral health disparities in children. Cooperative agreement awards are also available as a companion to this FOA. Letters of intent are due November 9, 2014.

Demonstration Sites in the News

Race and ethnicity are a barrier in finding a trusted health provider, according to the new Greater Cincinnati Community Health Status Survey. Four in 10 adults reported that race and ethnicity were a barrier, but African-Americans reported race and ethnicity as a barrier more than twice as often as white Appalachians and nonwhite Appalachians. Reducing these barriers is important because of the documented relationship between patient-provider trust and good health outcomes. “Having trust in this relationship leads to increased patient satisfaction and better compliance with treatment recommendations,” said Greer Glazer, dean of the University of Cincinnati’s College of Nursing and co-principal investigator at Urban Universities for Health at UC.
 
The University of Cincinnati also released a first-of-its-kind comprehensive regional health care workforce profile, which they commissioned from HealthLandscape, LLC.  The profile revealed significant gaps in available data, demonstrating the need for better data collection mechanisms in order to get a clear picture of the diversity and number of health care providers in the region. The profile is available for download as a PDF.
 
Steven L. Kanter, M.D., has been appointed dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Kanter is a neurosurgeon, a career physician-educator, and brings to UMKC a strong foundation in the growing field of medical informatics. He will begin his work at UMKC on October 1.
 
President Jay A. Gershen, D.D.S., Ph.D. of Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) has deepened the university’s commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion by establishing an Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion on campus.
 
Finally, Dr. Karen Bankston and Dr. Barb Tobias from the University of Cincinnati team will be interviewed by a local radio station (91.7 FM, WVXU)  on Monday, July 28 from 1:00-2:00pm Eastern Time about diversity in the health care workforce. We will share a recording (if available) with our colleagues outside of Cincinnati.

Other News

An interesting article on cultural competency describes how cultural competency training can actually serve to reinforce racial stereotyping by making providers believe they are the experts on a certain community. As an alternative, the authors propose that students train in structural competency instead, including a crash course in the social determinants of health.
 
Colleges are hoping that predictive analytics can fix their dismal graduation rates. More than 150 colleges are now using some form of predictive analytics – however, the field is fraught with unintended consequences. Once colleges know which students are most likely to drop out, will they help or neglect those students? And if potential applicants can be assessed in the same way, will they still be admitted to institutions struggling to improve their graduation rates?
 
A recent survey found little minority representation in hospital C-suites and on hospital boards, despite a surging minority general population.
 
The nursing workforce shortage may not be as severe as predicted. A series of articles describe how nurses are working longer and delaying retirement. In addition, nursing education programs have more than doubled the number of graduates since 2002.
 
New Mexico will soon have an osteopathic medical school, which will be based at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces.

Publications and Resources

Our Urban Universities for HEALTH co-Principal Investigator, Dr. Marc Nivet, has co-authored a new article, “Diversity Questions for Boards” in the May/June issue of Trusteeship Magazine.  The article was also covered by the AAMC’s Wing of Zock blog.
 
Nursing student diversity is on the rise, according to a new policy brief from AACN.
 
The Institute of Medicine has published a summary of their recent workshop on supporting a movement for health and health equity.
 
An article in JAMA shares data and findings from Healthy People 2020’s report card on the health of the nation.
 
For the 11th year in a row, AHRQ has produced the National Healthcare Quality Report (NHQR) and the National Healthcare Disparities Report (NHDR). These reports measure trends in effectiveness of care, patient safety, timeliness of care, patient centeredness, and efficiency of care. PDF versions of the reports are now available for download on the AHRQ website.
 
The Commonwealth Fund published a business case for addressing patients’ social needs. They report that with the confluence of sound economics and good policy, investing in interventions that address patients’ social as well as clinical needs is starting to make good business sense.

Click here to have our e-newsletter delivered to your inbox.

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2014-07-25T19:00:00+00:00
<![CDATA[University of Cincinnati releases new data on local health workforce]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/university-of-cincinnati-releases-new-data-on-local-health-workforce http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/university-of-cincinnati-releases-new-data-on-local-health-workforce#When:11:52:00Z Bookmark and Share

Cincinnati, OH - The University of Cincinnati (UC) recently completed a comprehensive regional health workforce profile, which contains up-to-date headcounts and available demographic data for health professionals within Hamilton County.

"As the area’s only Academic Health Center, it is our obligation to have an understanding of the health care workforce needs so that we can educate and graduate the appropriate numbers and types of students to fill these important roles,” says Greer Glazer, PhD, UC associate vice president for health affairs and dean, UC College of Nursing.

The profile, produced by HealthLandscape, LLC. in collaboration with the UC Academic Health Center, gathers data on advanced practice nurses, audiologists, community health workers, pharmacists, physical therapists, primary care physicians, registered dietitians, registered nurses, social workers and speech-language pathologists. Data was not available for all health care occupations. 

Although the profile provides much-needed workforce data, it also highlighted the need for improved data collection across all health professions.

"This study was eye-opening for us, as it put down on paper the challenges we have to gathering the data we need to be able to predict future workforce needs,” says Barbara Tobias, MD, Robert & Myfanwy Smith Endowed Professor, UC Department of Family and Community Medicine, and medical director of the Health Collaborative of Greater Cincinnati. 

Data for each occupation was drawn in late 2013 from a number of source files, including the American Medical Association Master File, the Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File, the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System (also known as the National Provider Identifier file, or NPI), the American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample, and Ohio state licensure files. Because the goals of each dataset vary, headcounts varied widely. 

"For example, three different source files for primary care physicians showed variations in headcounts on the order of hundreds,” says Tobias. "And depending upon where providers practice, versus where they live or bill, numbers can vary greatly.” 

Because of the limitations of the regional workforce profile, Glazer and Tobias say, next steps will be to find ways to better collect data in order to paint a clearer picture of the health care workforce in the region, hopefully using a model that other regions can follow.

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2014-07-17T11:52:00+00:00
<![CDATA[USU Presidents and Chancellors Discuss University Impact on Community Health]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/usu-presidents-and-chancellors-discuss-university-impact-on-community-healt http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/usu-presidents-and-chancellors-discuss-university-impact-on-community-healt#When:14:50:00Z

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Washington, DC - Universities are working to improve the health of their communities in a variety of ways, but it is not always easy for them to measure and communicate the success of their efforts. On June 24, members of the Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative convened in Washington, DC to share the results of their work to date with Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) presidents and chancellors. Each of the five university demonstration sites explained how their institutions have positively impacted community health in key areas common among across cities. They also discussed ongoing efforts to collect local data and improve evidence for existing community health needs.

Dr. Erik Porfli speaking on access to care in urban Cleveland

Dr. Greer Glazer, Dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, discussed how her institution is working to increase educational opportunities for and success of local students in health careers.  Metrics such as kindergarten readiness and high school graduation are already being tracked for Cincinnati public schools, and large disparities still exist.  UC’s minimum standards may explain why many local students are not successfully matriculating to UC; the minimum ACT score for the College of Nursing is 24, while the average in the Cincinnati public school system is only 19.

Dr. Jenifer Allsworth, Research Associate Professor in the Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, spoke about UMKC’s efforts to increase the knowledge and capability of all health professionals to address the social determinants of health. She explained that in Kansas City, the diversity of the patient population is much broader than race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. “It means dealing with patients from different cultures, patients who may be recent refugees, and patients who may not be legal residents.”  Most studies of cultural competence have focused on students and trainees, but more data is needed on the success of graduates, including feedback from health care employers.

Disparities in access to care are self-evident in data from urban neighborhoods in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Erik Porfeli, Assistant Dean for Community Engagement and Admissions at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) gave a compelling presentation showing that the Cleveland Clinic, which provides world class medical care, is located within just a few miles of some of the most impoverished, under-resourced communities in the city. Cleveland State University (CSU) and NEOMED have begun an effort to track providers and facilities by neighborhood, in order to accurately gauge workforce shortages and areas where additional health care resources are urgently needed.Dorothy Fyfe from SUNY Downstate leads the discussion on access to care

Presidents and chancellors then discussed how their institutions could use similar data to better inform university efforts to improve community health.  The need for standardized, longitudinal data systems and data collection technology was cited by many, as well as sustainable funding sources that would provide room for growth. Presidents and chancellors also described an pressing need to close the gap between what health care employers want, and how universities are preparing their students. They agreed that universities need to employ a cradle-to-career approach, reaching students as early as possible in their academic careers and working with them through graduation to provide them with skills needed for success in the future health workforce.

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About Urban Universities for HEALTH

Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership and Transformation of the Health Workforce) is a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The project aims to address the severe shortage of qualified health professionals in underserved areas by leveraging the power of urban universities to enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse, and prepared health workforce.

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2014-07-03T14:50:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Nursing Leaders Discuss Strategies for Enhancing the Nursing Workforce]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/nursing-leaders-get-creative-to-enhance-the-future-nursing-workforce http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/nursing-leaders-get-creative-to-enhance-the-future-nursing-workforce#When:15:42:00Z

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Washington, DC – Educating a nursing workforce that will meet community and health care employer needs was the focus of conversations among nursing deans at the Urban Universities for HEALTH summer meeting in Washington, DC last month.  Participating deans developed strategies for increasing the number and diversity of bachelor’s educated nurses, including accelerated, competency-based programs for returning veterans with field health experience, and “holistic admission” practices for enrolling students who will both succeed academically and in the workforce after graduation.

 

The June 23 sessions began with a presentation by Dean Mary Jane Hamilton from the College of Nursing and Health Sciences at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi. Dr. Hamilton shared outcomes from the eLine Military (ELM) Program, a successful, competency-based, online Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program targeting veterans with prior medical experience.  The program boasts a retention rate above 80 percent, and 60 percent of enrolled students are from underrepresented minority groups. After pre-requisites are completed, veteran students take an average of 18 months to complete the BSN degree.

The BSN is rapidly becoming the minimum standard among health care employers, with hospitals much more likely to hire a nurse with a BSN than an associate’s degree.  The BSN is also a stepping stone to more advanced careers in nursing, including faculty positions. Nursing schools urgently need new faculty members in order to expand their enrollments to address the nationwide nursing shortage.

Although the ELM program receives many inquiries from out-of-state students, it is limited to Texas due to state nursing board requirements. After Dr. Hamilton’s presentation, participants discussed the feasibility of bringing this successful program to scale at universities in other states, and what would be involved to transition the existing BSN curriculum to an online and competency-based curriculum.

Topics discussed included:

  • Addressing the shortage of clinical sites through new models of clinical education (such as adding community-based outpatient training sites);
  • Addressing the variation in BSN curriculum and clinical requirements by holding a national conversation with state nursing boards to align goals and standards for nursing education; and
  • Supporting student success in distance education by taking advantage of new technologies (such as Skype and Google Glass), as well as alternative methods of course delivery.

Click here to access a summary of the discussion.

Over lunch, Dr. Greer Glazer, Dean of the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, presented preliminary results from APLU/USU’s survey of admissions in the health professions. The survey sought to evaluate how many schools are using holistic admission as a strategy for increasing diversity and student success, as well as the impact of holistic admission practices on student outcomes. Nursing deans then discussed the results in teams, and identified potential solutions to common barriers associated with adopting the practice in nursing.

Both sessions highlighted the need to increase diversity within the nursing profession and graduate nurses who are better prepared to meet changing workforce demands. But nursing schools often don’t have good mechanisms for understanding what health employers need. “We need to look at employer satisfaction and use that as the measure by which we evaluate nursing graduates’ success,” one participant proposed. Deans agreed upon the need for more high-quality data in order to identify the determinants of success in nursing and better serve under-resourced communities.

Results from discussions with nursing deans will be used to inform the development and publication of a final report, expected Fall 2014.

 

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About Urban Universities for HEALTH

Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership and Transformation of the Health Workforce) is a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The project aims to address the severe shortage of qualified health professionals in underserved areas by leveraging the power of urban universities to enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse, and prepared health workforce.

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2014-07-02T15:42:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Pipeline program receives funding at UMKC, publication cites Ohio-based universities]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/pipeline-program-receives-funding-at-umkc-publication-cites-ohio-based-univ http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/pipeline-program-receives-funding-at-umkc-publication-cites-ohio-based-univ#When:20:04:00Z

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From the National Program Office

We are pleased to share the news that UMKC received a mini-grant from the Kansas City STEM Alliance to establish a summer HPAC program: “Healthy KC Affinity Groups.” UMKC hopes to expand this summer program into a year-long program, similar to the HPAC program modeled by NEOMED. 
 
An executive summary of our most recent annual meeting at the University of New Mexico is available online. The summary highlights key accomplishments and outcomes of the meeting, as well as anticipated next steps.
 
Finally, in our last newsletter we mentioned that several members of our Learning Collaborative participated in a briefing on health workforce diversity in Ohio, hosted by the Health Policy Institute of Ohio. The Institute has published a policy brief on the topic, citing both Urban Universities for HEALTH and individual efforts of our Ohio-based institutions.  The publication is now available online.
 

Funding Opportunities

NIH has posted an FOA aimed at higher education institutions to establish a Coordination Center to facilitate and support activities for NIMHD Transdisciplinary Collaborative Centers (TCCs) for Health Disparities Research.  One $2 million grant will be awarded. Letters of intent are due May 19, 2014.
 
The American Association of Colleges of Nursing, CDC Academic Partnership Project is pleased to announce a call for proposals for two small evaluation projects to increase the evidence base in the impact of academic/practice partnerships in public/population health.  Eligible applicants should be current members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing involved in an existing graduate or undergraduate academic/practice partnership that has been functional for at least 2 calendar years. Two grants in the amount of $5,000.00 each are available to support a small evaluation project. Please contact Mary Paterson, Project Director, at mpaterson@aacn.nche.edu to learn more about how to apply. Deadline: May 31, 2014.
 
HRSA has posted a grant opportunity to establish Regional Public Health Training Centers (as described in the Affordable Care Act).  Although any university may apply, applications from accredited schools of public health will be given preference. The deadline for applications is June 9, 2014.  Additional funding for technical assistance is also available.
 

News

The Supreme Court’s decision to affirm Michigan’s ban on affirmative action sparked an interesting conversation online among experts and researchers on how the ban has impacted minority enrollment, and whether or not alternatives to affirmative action have been effective. An op-ed in Time magazine argues that universities should seek out ways to support disadvantaged children earlier in the educational pipeline to increase academic preparedness and level the playing field years before potential students apply for college.
 
The American Medical Association assembled a convention of medical schools last month as part of an initiative called “Accelerating Change in Medical Education,” a competition challenging schools to create their best proposal for innovative medical training. Each winning college received a $1 million grant to implement their proposal over five years.  Proposals included learning communities to provide coaching and mentorship, early graduation for students with prior experience in health fields, and changes to admissions and residency processes that would recruit more students with problem-solving skills.
 
A recent U.S. Senate Subcommittee Hearing focused on "Addressing Primary Care Access and Workforce Challenges.” Testimony was provided by a number of community health organization representatives, health care executives, and medical residents. Individual testimony is available for download, as well as a video of the proceedings.

Upcoming Events

Population health is receiving increased attention for its role in improving health care, specifically its impact on health care disparities. Hospitals in Pursuit of Excellence will hold a webinar on Tuesday, May 30 from 2:30-3:30pm Eastern Time entitled "Serving the Most Vulnerable: Population Health and the Reduction of Health Care Disparities." This webinar will examine how hospitals, health care providers and clinicians are using population health to advance equitable care and its overall benefits to the work they do.
 
The Association of Clinicians for the Underserved will hold their 2014 Annual Meeting and Health IT Forum on June 25-27 in Alexandria, VA.  The meeting will bring clinical leaders and top government officials together to focus on improving access to care for millions of people living in underserved areas of our country.
 

Publications and Resources

The University of Massachusetts Medical School published a perspective piece on the dynamics of state university participation in state Medicaid administration, using cases from Maryland, Massachusetts, and Ohio as examples of success. The authors argue that the appropriateness and benefits of state universities engaging in Medicaid administration have been well established, and that such partnerships have the opportunity to strengthen the Medicaid system through preparation of the clinical workforce.
 
Current measures of access to care have intrinsic limitations and may not accurately reflect the capacity of the primary care system to absorb new patients.  A study published in JAMA assesses primary care appointment availability by state and insurance status. The researchers found that access varies widely across states and insurance status, and recommended increased use of patient navigators to alleviate disparities.
 
The University of Michigan Medical School has developed a resource called “Caring with Compassion” that uses gaming to improve skills needed to serve at-risk and vulnerable populations. CME credits are offered for participation.

 

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2014-05-02T20:04:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Learning Collaborative Highlights Importance of Measuring Community Impact at 2014 Annual Meeting]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-highlights-importance-of-community-engagement-at-201 http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-highlights-importance-of-community-engagement-at-201#When:09:58:00Z

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Albuquerque, NM - On March 3-4, 2014, the Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative successfully held its 2014 Annual Meeting at the University of New Mexico (UNM) campus.  The meeting focused on how universities are measuring the impact of their efforts on the diversity and cultural competence of the health workforce, particularly with regard to alleviating disparities in their local areas. 

Leaders from the five university demonstration sites shared their ideas for solutions to common health workforce challenges, and generated new strategies for capturing evidence and working more closely with communities.  The meeting marked the conclusion of Phase 1 of the Urban Universities for HEALTH project, during which the demonstration sites assessed local community health needs and developed a set of priority community health outcomes aligned with institutional goals.  The group emerged from the meeting with a set of high-priority projects to address over the course of the next year.

The following are a few highlights from the two-day meeting:

Visiting university teams learned from Dr. Paul Roth, Chancellor of the Health Sciences Center, about UNM’s experience implementing Vision 2020. UNM’s aim in creating Vision 2020 was to work with community partners to help New Mexico make more progress in health and health equity than any other state by 2020.  Dr. Roth discussed UNM’s success in aligning each of the Health Sciences Center colleges to better achieve the vision and measure its impact in the community.  Participants also traveled off campus to visit sites in a local underserved community where UNM’s Health Sciences Center is conducting its work.

Participants contributed their feedback on a series of learning products that they will work together to complete this year.  Examples include: a framework for health workforce metrics that will aid development of a metrics dashboard, a web-based resource for assessing community health needs, and a publication on priority community health outcomes that universities can seek to impact through their health workforce efforts.

Demonstration site teams presented a set of pilot projects currently in development on their campuses that target key health workforce outcomes for their communities. Examples include: expansion of a successful pipeline program that engages high school students in community health projects, and leveraging social media and other web-based resources to attract more potential students from local underserved communities.

Participants left the meeting with an agreed-upon set of goals and next steps for Phase 2 of the project. Over the next year, sites will work together to develop metrics aligned with priority community health outcomes  in each of their cities, as well as metrics that can be scaled for use among universities nationwide.

To learn more about what the Learning Collaborative accomplished, read the full-length article published by the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center Newsbeat.

Download the Executive Summary (PDF)

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About Urban Universities for HEALTH

Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership and Transformation of the Health Workforce) is a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The project aims to address the severe shortage of qualified health professionals in underserved areas by leveraging the power of urban universities to enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse, and prepared health workforce.

 

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2014-04-21T09:58:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Urban Universities for HEALTH highlighted by the Health Policy Institute of Ohio]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/urban-universities-for-health-highlighted-by-the-health-policy-institute-of http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/urban-universities-for-health-highlighted-by-the-health-policy-institute-of#When:14:36:00Z

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Columbus, OH - The Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative was highlighted in a policy brief on diversifying Ohio's health workforce, published this month by the Health Policy Institute of Ohio (HPIO). The University of Cincinnati and NEOMED's Health Professions Affinity Community (HPAC) program were also cited, along with outcomes data and evidence of their successes. Congratulations to our Ohio-based demonstration sites for being recognized for your efforts!

 

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2014-04-18T14:36:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Learning Collaborative hits the road to talk about health equity]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-hits-the-road-to-talk-about-health-equity http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-hits-the-road-to-talk-about-health-equity#When:18:00:00Z

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From the NPO

This month, several members of the Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative will be engaging in outreach activities to promote the importance of health workforce development for health equity. Dr. Barb Tobias (University of Cincinnati) and Dr. Gina Weisblat (NEOMED) will be headed to the Health Policy Institute of Ohio (HPIO) in Columbus, OH later this month to participate in a briefing and discussion on the role of diversity in the health care workforce. April is also National Minority Health Month, and members of the National Program Office will staff an exhibit on Urban Universities for HEALTH at a commemorative event held on the NIH campus next week.

Funding Opportunities

SAMHSA will award $6.8 million in funding to minority-serving institutions (MSIs) to partner with one or more community-based organizations to provide integrated substance abuse, Hepatitis-C (HCV), and HIV prevention programs to minority in the surrounding communities. The deadline to submit a proposal is April 16, 2014.  

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce.  Funding is provided for the development of creative educational activities with a primary focus on Research Experiences, Courses for Skills Development, and Mentoring Activities.  $2.5 million is available for 5-10 individual awards. An LOI is due April 28, with full proposals due May 28, 2014.

Through its Innovations in Care Program, the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation will award two grants of up to $600,000 to support innovations that provide care to vulnerable populations, including the economically disadvantaged, racial and ethnic minorities, and other groups that encounter barriers to accessing quality health care.  Brief proposals are due May 1, with full proposals due May 25, 2014.

The National Association of Medical Minority Educators will award eight $1,000 scholarships to underrepresented minority students who have completed their first year of health professions training. The deadline to apply is June 13, 2014. Please share this opportunity with your students.

Other Opportunities

Under contract with HHS, the National Quality Forum (NQF) will develop a common population health framework for communities that will offer practical guidance for improving population health. . NQF is accepting public comments through April 16.

What does health equity mean to you? A group of physicians, other health care providers, communicators, students and researchers at the University of Michigan have joined together to catalyze a national conversation on health care equity and how it can be attained across all segments of U.S. society and the globe. Submit your 8 words on health equity here: http://healthyconversation.org/

This summer, the NIMHD will host a Translational Health Disparities Course entitled “Integrating Principles of Science, Practice and Policy in Health Disparities Research.” The course will take place on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, from August 11, 2014 to August 22, 2014. The course is free, but admission is competitive and participants are responsible for transportation, room and board. Submit an application via the NIMHD website from April 14, 2014 to May 22, 2014.

News

The CDC have awarded the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies a $7 million grant — the largest in the school’s history — to establish it as a national HIV-prevention resource center.

The University of Missouri-Kansas City has announced the appointment of Susan Wilson, Ph.D., as the Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Inclusion. She will begin her new duties on April 17.

Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) is poised to complete a $70 million health, wellness and education center complex. The 177,250-square-foot project is expected to include a fitness center, office space for local health care providers, a new home for the on-campus STEM school and classroom space. 

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) has received $1.25 million from the NIH to prepare undergraduate students from underrepresented minority populations, including students with disabilities, for admission to graduate programs in the biomedical and behavioral sciences.

The newly released 2014 County Health Rankings show that people living in the least healthy counties are twice as likely to have shorter lives as residents of the healthiest counties. Read the full report here.

Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, resigned this week.

A Virginia-based group has targeted UW-Madison, Harvard University, and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill over their admissions practices, which the group claims unfairly discriminate by race.

The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) has recently launched their new website, which includes keyword-searchable research portal.

Upcoming Events

ASPPH will host the third webinar in the ASPPH Presents series featuring Dr. Marc Nivet, Chief Diversity Officer at AAMC on April 24, 2014 from 2:00-3:00pm Eastern Time. “Diversity as a Vital Component of Health Systems Change” will teach participants the value of using diversity in academic institutions to increase the quality of education and will highlight tools for increasing and maintaining diversity in schools and programs of public health.

Please join the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT and the Office of Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a free webinar entitled, “Exploring the Impact of Health IT on Consumer Engagement and Empowerment for Communities of Color” on April 24, 2014 from 2:00-3:30pm Eastern Time.

The 10th Annual Health Workforce Research Conference, hosted by the AAMC Center for Workforce Studies, will be held May 1-2, 2014, in Washington, DC. The theme of this year’s conference, which has broadened in focus to include all health professions, is “Finding the Right Fit: The Health Workforce Needed to Support the Affordable Care Act.”

The Health Workforce Technical Assistance Center will host the webinar “Data, Methods, and Tips for Health Workforce Supply and Demand Modeling” on May 14, 2014 from 2:00-3:00pm Eastern Time.

Data experts, technology developers, policy makers, health care system leaders, and community advocates will convene for Health Datapalooza on June 1-3 in Washington, DC.

Publications and Resources

 The CTSA Consortium's Community Engagement Key Function Committee has developed a unified taxonomy of community health indicators for monitoring progress toward population health outcomes.

A new paper in the Journal of Primary Prevention describes preliminary results of Acción para la Salud, a public health intervention in which Community Health Workers (CHWs) from five health agencies engaged their community in the process of making positive systems and environmental changes.

Authors of an article published in the Journal of Healthcare Management surveyed over 400 nurse executives in hospitals, nurse-led clinics, and home and hospice companies to explore how healthcare employers are working to increase the number of bachelors-prepared nurses in the workforce.

An article in the Journal of Dental Education entitled Retaining New Dentists in Iowa: A Role for Dental Schools in Facilitating Graduates’ Connections to Practice Opportunities in Underserved Areas explores how The University of Iowa College of Dentistry and Dental Clinics succeeded in promoting dental practice opportunities in Iowa for its graduates.

The March 2014 edition of AAMC’s Analysis in Brief explores the “leaking out” of underrepresented students from the medical school pipeline, and the extent to which socioeconomic factors and race play a role.

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2014-04-11T18:00:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Highlights from New Mexico, new funding opportunities, and neighborhood-level data]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/highlights-from-new-mexico-new-funding-opportunities-and-neighborhood-level http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/highlights-from-new-mexico-new-funding-opportunities-and-neighborhood-level#When:10:35:00Z

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From the National Program Office

The Learning Collaborative held its 2014 Annual Meeting earlier this month at the University of New Mexico campus. Participants learned about UNM’s efforts to reduce health disparities through a variety of opportunities, including a conversation with community health workers and a tour of a local elementary school in an underserved neighborhood. The importance of community engagement was highlighted throughout the meeting, as participants grappled with how to measure the university’s impact on community health outcomes. Site teams shared their ideas for solutions to common health workforce challenges, and the group emerged with a set of high-priority projects that they will work towards in the coming months.  An official meeting summary is forthcoming; in the meantime, you can find more details in the article published by UNM’s Newsbeat.

Funding Opportunities

The Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) program provides opportunities to develop new or expand existing effective institutional developmental programs designed to prepare a diverse group of students in the biomedical and behavioral sciences for competitive research careers and leadership positions in these fields. These grants are awards to institutions that confer the baccalaureate and/or doctoral degree in biomedical and/or behavioral science fields, have a demonstrated commitment to encourage and assist students from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral sciences, and have a research-intensive environment.  Applications are due May 1, 2014.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has issued a call for proposals to fund up to three implementations of paired health care payment and delivery system changes that incorporate a focus on reducing disparities in care and/or outcomes. The grants will inform the development of new care delivery and payment models, by demonstrating potential ways to build-in a financially-supported focus on equity, and will inform health care organizations and providers with new practices for developing and implementing disparities interventions within the context of new and emerging payment models.  The deadline is April 18, 2014.

Other Opportunities

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has issued an Request for Information  to obtain input on strategies to strengthen the research and training environment at Diversity Focused Institutions (DFIs) for early stage faculty career development.  Responses are due by April 28, 2014.
 
The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) is now soliciting nominations for the annual Herbert W. Nickens Presidential Award ($10,000), the Nickens Faculty Fellowship ($15,000) and the Medical Student Scholarships Awards ($5,000). For more detailed information about each award and eligibility criteria, visit https://www.aamc.org/initiatives/awards/.  Nominations for the three awards must be received by May 2, 2014. Nominations are now accepted via email at NickensAwards@aamc.org.

News

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez recently signed legislation creating a statewide community health worker training and certification program, with community health workers eligible for reimbursement from Medicaid. In addition to the changes for community health workers,  New Mexico’s state government has expanded residency slots at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and added six New Mexico dental slots in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE).

The University of Cincinnati has refocused its metrics for success toward retention and graduation rates. The need to improve rates at UC is increasingly important if the university wants to meet benchmarks set the UC2019 Academic Master Plan, which calls for increasing first-year retention rate to 90 percent and the overall six-year graduation rate to 75 percent.
 
Dwight Tillery, President and CEO for the Center for Closing the Health Gap shares insights from a recent discussion he had with Dr. Thomas Boat, Dean of the University of Cincinnati’s College of Medicine. He writes that "the academic world has the power to make an impact on the health gap in three major ways: by addressing the substandard quality of care given to minorities seeking health care, addressing the shortage of people of color in the medical profession, and assisting us during the research phases of our program creation and execution.

Doctors from Duke University, the CDC, and the de Beaumont Foundation have developed an online repository of tools and resources to support collaborations between primary care and public health groups, as well as the use of Health IT to improve population health. The repository seeks to “leverage the 300-year-old infrastructure of public health to support the fabulous work that primary care providers are already doing.”

A group of students from the Latino Medical Student Association have written a blog entry on the importance of engaging Latino students and residents to health policy early in their education.  They argue that doing so will help create skilled leaders in Latino health care who are prepared to advocate for equality and ensure successful implementation of legislative gains.

Upcoming Events

AAMC will hold a webinar on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 from 12:30-1:40 p.m. EDT on the various ways that the Diversity Engagement Survey (DES) can help improve institutional culture and climate through the lens of diversity and inclusion.
 
An agenda and list of speakers is now available online for The Healthcare Quality and Equity Action Forum: Pursuing High-Value Healthcare on June 19-20, 2014 in Boston, MA at the Boston Seaport Hotel. The forum is convened by The Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Publications and Resources

The Cincinnati Health Department (CHD) has produced information on life expectancy for each of 47 neighborhood groupings. This data has never been available before and is an important step in improving the quality and extending the life of local residents.  

The National Conference of State Legislators has published a useful summary of state legislation that has been introduced to address the social determinants of health and is aimed at eliminating health disparities for underserved populations. 

AAMC’s 2014 Health Equity Research Snapshot highlights seven new research projects underway at AAMC-member institutions. The AAMC solicited these videos from researchers and their teams to represent the rich variety of populations and health outcomes that health equity researchers investigate.
 
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation recently published an issue brief on health care disparities, which seeks to identify emerging perspectives, progress and current activity, and outstanding needs.  Although the brief focuses specifically on health care disparities, it recognizes that these are intertwined with broader efforts to reduce health disparities.  
 
The culture of academic medicine has been described as hierarchical, competitive, and not highly supportive of female or minority faculty. In response, the authors of this study designed the Learning Action Network (LAN), in which institutional leaders and faculty representatives met twice yearly to form a cross-institutional learning community. The authors learned that people, structures, policies, and reward systems must be put into place to support cultural values, and broad-based support should be created in order for changes to persist when inevitable transitions in leadership occur.

A systematic literature review has been published in Family Medicine on retention and recruitment of minority faculty members. The authors found strong evidence that faculty development programs and mentoring programs increase retention, productivity, and promotion for this group of medical faculty.
 

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2014-03-24T10:35:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Metrics, meetings, and an engaging discussion on diversity and inclusion from UC]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/metrics-meetings-and-a-chance-to-watch-ucs-academic-health-center-in-action http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/metrics-meetings-and-a-chance-to-watch-ucs-academic-health-center-in-action#When:14:31:00Z

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From the NPO

The Learning Collaborative is busy preparing for our Annual Meeting on March 3-4, hosted by the University of New Mexico. We hope to engage attendees and accelerate learning through number of interactive, participant-led sessions.  Sites have also begun the process of developing metrics by sharing a small set of existing measures that they are currently using to evaluate their health workforce programs.  These indicators will be shared at our annual meeting to kick-start a discussion on measuring success across health professions.

Funding Opportunities

The AAMC Group on Diversity and Inclusion (GDI) has announced a call for proposals for scholarship on faculty diversity and inclusion. Manuscript proposals (not to exceed 300 words) are due March 3, 2014.

The Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP) has issued a call for applications for 4-year postdoctoral research awards.  Awards are offered to universities, schools of medicine and dentistry and research institutions to support the research and career development of physicians and dentists from historically disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to developing careers in academic medicine and dentistry and to serving as role models for students and faculty of similar background. Applications are due March 18, 2014.

The Institute on Medicine as a Profession (IMAP) and the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation are pleased to announce the continuation of the Education and Training to Professionalism Initiative. Five awards will support faculty-directed educational programs that address one or several of the critical components of medical professionalism. Grants will be provided for a two-year period at $25,000 per year. The proposal deadline has been extended to April 11, 2014.
 
A call for proposals has been issued by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for Public Health Law Research: Making the Case for Laws That Improve Health. The goal of this program is to build the evidence for and increase the use of effective regulatory, legal and policy solutions—whether statutes, regulations, case law or other policies—to protect and improve population health and the public health system.  Proposals are due April 15, 2014.
 
AAMC invites nominations for the David E. Rogers Award. The annual $10,000 award recognizes a medical school faculty member who has made major contributions to improving the health and health care of the American people. The nomination deadline is May 2, 2014.

News

Under a proposed constitutional amendment, California voters would reconsider affirmative action programs at the University of California and California State University systems on the November ballot.
 
Diversity is immensely valuable to any higher education institution, but not all universities and colleges are successful or even aware of how to recruit a diverse student population. John LaBrie, dean and vice president for Professional Education at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies shares his insights into this topic in an interview with Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.
 
A majority of colleges attribute little or no importance to students’ race and ethnicity or first-generation status when reviewing applications, according to survey findings from the National Association for College Admission Counseling.
 
Virginia Commonwealth University has received a five-year grant totaling nearly $1.5 million to enhance teaching and advising at VCU and two local community colleges. The ultimate goal of the grant from the National Institutes of Health is to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups in careers in biomedical and behavioral research.
 
Temple University hopes to help students graduate on time by offering grants to low-income students who agree to limit their outside work hours.
 
Does design thinking have a place in health care? Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO, and Nicholas LaRusso, M.D., former Medical Director of the Center for Innovation, discuss the similarities and differences about science, design and the importance of design thinking in health care.
 
Ten large drug companies that rarely share their secrets agreed to work together with the National Institutes of Health to find cures for a number of major diseases including diabetes and Alzheimer’s. The project will last five years, cost $230 million and at the end, all the findings will be free for anyone to use.
   
The Urban Institute’s Health Policy Center has calculated metro-level numbers from states that refused the Medicaid expansion, and the results are staggering.

Upcoming Events

The American Interprofessional Health Collaborative will hold a webinar on Tuesday, March 4, from 2:30-3:30pm Eastern Time on developing interprofessional educational collaboration across multiple institutions (Universities, Professional Schools, Clinics, & Health Systems).
 
On Wednesday, March 5, from 6:00-7:00pm Eastern Time, the Rockefeller University Hospital and Heilbrunn Family Center for Research Nursing will hold a webcast on implementation of evidence-based nursing and implications for leadership, education, and practice.
 
National Hispanic Medical Association annual conference will be held on March 28-30, 2014 in Washington, DC. The theme this year is the “Affordable Care Act & Best Practices for Hispanics”
 
The Leadership Learning Community will hold an in-person workshop entitled “Tools for Transformation: Supporting inclusive, networked, and collective leadership,” at the California Endowment in Oakland, CA on May 5-7, 2014.
 
Save the date for the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) Summer Meeting on June 23-24, 2014 in Washington, DC.

Publications and Resources

See what you've missed at the 2014 Diversity and Inclusion Seminar Series hosted by the University of Cincinnati’s Academic Health Center deans. Two sessions remain in this February series, and video recordings of the first two sessions are available.
 
The Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce program has launched a new online discussion forum to stimulate conversations about novel and creative strategies needed to engage a diverse student pool in the early phases of biomedical research training, sustain their interest, and enable success at each career phase.
 
AAMC has launched the Public Health in Medical Education Online Community of Practice through its cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  This online community provides an interactive forum for medical educators to explore innovations and share resources to promote increased public health awareness along the continuum of medical education.  Space is limited.  Please e-mail Sherese Johnson at to learn more information or join the community.
 
The American Journal of Nursing recently published an article examining whether foreign-educated nurses believed they were treated equitably in the US workplace from 2003 to 2007. The researchers found that 51% of respondents reported receiving insufficient orientation and 40% reported at least one discriminatory practice with regard to wages, benefits, or shift or unit assignments. Those educated in low-income countries and those recruited by staffing agencies were more likely to report inequitable treatment compared to their U.S. counterparts.
 
Innovative workforce models are being developed and implemented to meet the changing demands of primary care. A literature review was conducted to construct a typology of workforce models used by primary care practices, and five key workforce innovation concepts emerged: team care, population focus, additional resource support, creating workforce connections, and role change.

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2014-02-21T14:31:00+00:00
<![CDATA[NEOMED partners with Kent State, and UMKC trains nurses to be more humanistic]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-update-1-24-2014 http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-update-1-24-2014#When:20:01:00Z

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From the NPO

The Learning Collaborative is preparing for its next in-person working meeting, scheduled for March 3-4 at the University of New Mexico campus.  In advance of this meeting, one of our working groups, the Metrics Learning Group, shared a draft framework and menu of example metrics for measuring health education and workforce efforts at higher education institutions.  More information on this developing resource is forthcoming.  In the meantime, the Collaborative aims to learn more about metrics already in use at institutions.

Funding Opportunities

The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation is looking for nursing and medical school faculty who are committed to careers in health professional education for its 2014 Macy Faculty Scholars program.  Each Scholar will receive salary support at $100,000 per year over two years.  The deadline for applications is February 26, 2014.  An informational webinar about the program was held on January 7, and a recording of the webinar is available on the Macy Faculty Scholars webpage.

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) announced on Wednesday that it seeks to appoint up to 25 new biomedical researchers through a national open competition. The initiative represents an investment of approximately $150 million in basic biomedical research over the next five years. The deadline for applications is June 3, 2014, and finalists will be selected in 2015.

The 2014 National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Loan Repayment Program is now open, and will close on March 20, 2014.  Eligible applicants may receive up to $50,000 in exchange for two years of service. Licensed primary care physician, dentist, mental or behavioral care providers with unpaid educational loans and who are employed at or have accepted an offer of employment at a NHSC-approved site may apply.

NIH has released two new FOAs to support research that targets the reduction of health disparities among minority and underserved children.  The R01 opportunity opened on January 5, and the R21 opportunity opened January 16.  Standard dates apply.

A technical assistance webinar will be held on Friday, February 14, 2014 from 11:00-12:30pm EST for applicants to the NIH PRIDE opportunity (Programs to Increase Diversity Among Individuals Engaged in Health-Related Research).

Community-Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH) seeks an accomplished leader in community-academic partnerships and health/public health to serve as Executive Director beginning on September 1, 2014. With CCPH operating in a virtual environment, the person can be located anywhere in the U.S.  Application review begins February 24, 2014.

News

Nancy L. Zimpher, chancellor of the State University of New York (SUNY) system, was featured in a Politico article last week for her leadership and collaboration with the White House on expanding college opportunity.  President Obama was quoted as praising Chancellor Zimpher for “making sure that hundreds of thousands of SUNY students all across the state are getting a world-class higher education.”

Students pursuing a career in pharmacy now have an accelerated pathway to complete both a bachelor’s degree and Doctor of Pharmacy degree in seven years through a new partnership agreement between Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) and Kent State University.

The deans of the University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center have just launched a series of seminars on diversity and inclusion in the health professions.  The seminars, which are the result of a collaborative effort by all four AHC deans, will take place throughout the month of February 2014 and will feature a variety of insights and speakers. 

The Arnold P. Gold Foundation chose the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies as one of its grantees to start mentoring nurses in training and early practice to be more humanistic in their patient care.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has created a new state office to oversee changes in health care, including efforts to expand the workforce.  The new Office of Health Innovation and Transformation will be in charge of carrying out recommendations from a state-led group of health policy leaders, health care providers, insurers and others.

Less than six months after taking office, Wayne State University President M. Roy Wilson is pushing an ambitious agenda.

A Chronicle of Higher Education article this month covered the NIH’s response to racial disparities in its grant awards. The response addresses the findings of a 2011 study, which discovered that minority scientists win a disproportionately small share of NIH grants.

More than 100 college presidents and dozens of nonprofit, corporate, and foundation leaders were gathered at the White House last week for a daylong summit on expanding college opportunity. Leaders were asked by President Obama to commit to action in one of several areas crucial to college opportunity. The White House also released a report entitled “Increasing College Opportunity for Low-Income Students.”

A New York Times article explored how skyrocketing salaries in certain medical specialties have contributed to rising health care costs for patients.

Upcoming Events

What does it really mean to be an equitable leader? And how do you know if your decisions, policies, and practices are truly equitable? Find out at the Leadership Learning Community’s webinar, “Equity and Leadership,” which will be held on January 28 from 4:00-5:00pm EST.

The AAMC will host a webinar, “Enhancing Your Medical Career with a Public Health Experience,” on February 5, 2014 from 7:00-8:00pm EST.  Presenters include AAMC’s Dr. Malika Fair, MD, MPH, as well as experts from the CDC and non-profit leaders. 

The UNC Minority Health Conference, scheduled for February 28, 2014 in Chapel Hill, NC, will be on “Innovative Approaches to Youth Health: Engaging Youth in Creating Healthy Communities.” The conference provides a forum for scholarly exchange of ideas related to understanding and addressing continuing health disparities in minority populations.

Community-Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH) is convening its 13th International Conference April 30 - May 3, 2014 in Chicago, IL. This year’s conference theme is: “From Rhetoric to Reality: Achieving Authentic, Equitable & Transformative Partnerships.”

The Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital is holding a Healthcare Quality and Equity Action Forum on June 19-20, 2014 in Boston, MA.

The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) annual meeting will be held from June 23-24, 2014 in Washington, DC.  Urban Universities for HEALTH will plan working meetings and activities in conjunction with the USU meeting, so please save the date.

Publications and Resources

A study published this week in the International Journal of Men’s Health found that health disparities among U.S. African American and Hispanic Men cost the economy more than $450 billion over a four-year period (2006-2009).  The study looks at both the direct and indirect costs associated with health inequalities and projects the potential cost savings of eliminating these disparities.

In a JAMA article, the associations between minority faculty development programs at US medical schools and underrepresented minority faculty representation, recruitment, and promotion are examined. The authors found that the simple presence of a minority faculty development program did not increase minority faculty representation, recruitment, or promotion – but that certain high-intensity programs did.

Why isn’t evidence based practice improving health care for minorities in the United States?  Authors Lee, Fitzpatrick, and Baik in Applied Nursing Research identified a lack of data on evidence based practice, limited research on the generalizability of evidence, and sociocultural considerations as contributing factors.  The authors recommend contextualizing evidence based practice “within the social environments in which patients are treated.”

The UIC School of Public Health, the Center for State and Local Government Excellence, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation collaborated on a report that examines the efficacy of various recruitment and retention strategies for the local health department workforce. 

The AAMC has published a report entitled “Promising Practices: Promoting Faculty Engagement and Retention at U.S. Medical Schools.” This report presents the results of a survey conducted in 2011 as part of the AAMC’s Faculty Forward peer-learning program. 

The Annals of Family Medicine has published an article in its January/February 2014 issue entitled “The Four Pillars for Primary Care Physician Workforce Reform: A Blueprint for Future Activity.”  The four pillars: pipeline, process of medical education, practice transformation, and payment reform, are discussed individually, along with recommendations for advocacy.

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2014-01-24T20:01:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Happy New Year from the Learning Collaborative! What’s next?]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-update-1-3-2014 http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-update-1-3-2014#When:15:06:00Z

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From the NPO

Happy New Year from the Urban Universities for HEALTH National Program Office! We hope everyone had a wonderful holiday break and that your new year is off to a great start. We’re looking forward to working with our demonstration sites to finalize Phase 1 of the project (Identify Systemic Health Workforce Goals), and begin Phase 2 (Develop Metrics). For more information about upcoming activities and project phases for the Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative, click here.

Funding Opportunities

In our last newsletter, we shared information about three new NIH funding opportunities related to workforce diversity: the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN), the Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) initiative, and the NIH Coordination and Evaluation Center (CEC) for Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce Program.  NIH will hold a technical assistance webinar for applicants on January 14, 2014, from 12:00pm - 5:00pm EST. If you cannot join the live webinar, an archived recording will be posted on the NIH website.

News

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has announced $20 million in grants to be awarded to the state’s public colleges and universities for educating more students in high-demand mental health care fields. About one-fifth of the proposed funding would be awarded to the University of Missouri-Kansas City, enabling the university to expand its educational programs, hire new faculty, and establish a new master’s degree track focusing on mental health care within the School of Nursing and Health Studies.
 
The Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated – one of the nation's premier volunteer service organizations of professional African American women – have established a formal collaboration that aims to develop a more diverse health care workforce. The joint initiative ranges from raising health awareness in the African American community to facilitating scientific research.
 
An interdisciplinary team of medical residents, business students and law students from the University of New Mexico developed a free mobile app to help New Mexicans determine their eligibility for health insurance. The app also directs users to external resources, as well as physical locations where they can apply for services.
 
The University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute was highlighted in the Cincinnati Enquirer for its success in attracting patients, private donations, and research dollars.
 
Francis Collins, Director of the NIH, argues in a Washington Post op-ed that a number of converging factors and transformative opportunities have made increased investment in biomedical research an urgent priority for the United States.
 
Stanford University medical student Rahul Rekhi discusses the need to incorporate health policy training into the medical school curriculum in an op-ed published today in the Los Angeles Times.

Upcoming Events

The AAMC will hold two faculty development webinars as part of their Diversity 3.0 Learning Series. "Charting a Course as a Clinician Investigator" will be held January 30, 2014, from 2:00pm – 3:00pm EST, and "Navigating through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s (AHRQ) Career Development Opportunities" will be held February 13, 2014, from 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EST.

Publications and Resources

A research study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that minority physicians care for the majority of underserved patients, including racial and ethnic minorities, patients with chronic diseases, and the uninsured.  In addition, non-white physicians cared for over 70 percent of non-English-speaking patients.  The researchers concluded that “increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the physician workforce may be key to meeting national goals to eliminate health disparities.”
 
A special supplement to the ASPPH publication Public Health Reports, entitled “Nursing in 3D: Diversity, Disparities, and Social Determinants,” includes an article by AAMC’s Marc Nivet and Anne Berlin entitled Workforce Diversity and Community-Responsive Health-Care Institutions. Other articles from the supplement cover a variety of topics related to workforce diversity, health equity, and the social determinants of health.
 
A new study in Academic Medicine reveals that gender disparities exist among different medical faculty career tracks.  Only 20 percent of medical schools report more women than men in tenure track positions (those engaging in teaching, research, and patient care), while 77 percent report having more women than men in clinician-educator positions (involving only patient care and teaching).  Those in tenure track positions are more likely to be promoted than clinician-educators.
 
A study in the journal Hypertension has found that African-American men who grew up in single-parent homes are more likely to have health problems stemming from high blood pressure than African-American men who grew up in two-parent households. The study is “the first study of an African-American population to document an association between childhood family living arrangements and blood pressure.”
 
A new journal, the Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, has been established and will publish its first issue in March, although papers will begin appearing online in January.

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2014-01-03T15:06:00+00:00
<![CDATA[A new study on admissions, and a new home for CSU/NEOMED’s Partnership for Urban Health]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-update-12-20-2013 http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/learning-collaborative-update-12-20-2013#When:22:45:00Z

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From the National Program Office

The National Program Office is pleased to announce the launch of a national study on the use of holistic admission practices in the health professions. The study will examine how universities are using holistic review and other promising practices, with the goal of improving evidence in support of admission strategies that lead to a more diverse and culturally competent health workforce. The study will be led by Dr. Greer Glazer, dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Cincinnati.  A supplemental grant has been awarded to the AAMC and USU/APLU to fund additional research and activities associated with the study, which we expect to complete by the end of October 2014.

Funding Opportunities

Three new funding opportunities have been announced as part of the NIH Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce Program: the Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) initiative, the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN), and the Coordination and Evaluation Center (CEC). Awardees funded through these initiatives will work together as a consortium which will be coordinated by the CEC. Letters of intent are due February 18, 2014, and applications are due March 18, 2014. Public and private universities that receive less than $7.5 million (total costs) of NIH research project grant (RPG) funding annually and have an award-eligible pool of undergraduate students, at least 25% of whom are supported by Pell grants, are eligible to apply. 

The goal of Programs to Increase Diversity Among Individuals Engaged in Health-Related Research (PRIDE) is to enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce, and to encourage the development of creative educational activities. Activities will be supported and complemented by the Coordination Center for Programs to Increase Diversity among Individuals Engaged in Health-Related Research (PRIDE). For both funding opportunities, letters of intent are due February 13, 2014, and applications are due March 13, 2014.

CDC's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and the Office of Minority Health (OMH) have announced a Health Disparities Service Fellowship in NCHS' Office of the Center Director.  The Fellow, reporting to the Director of Extramural Research, will develop a research program to examine health disparities using data from across the Center. Applications are due January 15, 2014.

The Reducing Health Disparities among Minority and Underserved Children initiative encourages research that targets the reduction of health disparities among children.  Standard dates apply, and applications will be accepted beginning January 5, 2014. Both R1 and R21 funding opportunities are being offered.

News

Cleveland State University to Debut New Interprofessional Model for Health-Care Education
Cleveland State has broken ground “on a state-of-the-art facility where future physicians, pharmacists, nurses and other health professionals will learn to work together at the forefront of collaborative health-care education and research.” In addition to housing CSU programs offered by the School of Nursing and the School of Health Sciences, the building will also house the Cleveland cohort of NEOMED’s programs within their College of Medicine, College of Pharmacy and College of Graduate Studies and will serve as the home of the NEOMED-CSU Partnership for Urban Health. The 100,000 square foot, $45 million building is scheduled to be completed in June 2015.
 
The Kaiser Permanente Burch Minority Leadership Development Program has announced its 2014-2016 awardees, which include two scholars from our Learning Collaborative.  Lisa Cacari-Stone, PhD is an Assistant Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine-Public Health Program and a Senior Fellow, Robert Johns Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. LeConté J. Dill, DrPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at the State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate Medical Center.  These awards are designed to facilitate the establishment and maintenance of connections and dialogue with health policymakers in federal, state and local governments and to develop and sustain the visibility and emerging leadership of these minority researchers.
 
Obama administration awards $55 million to boost health-care workforce
The Department of Health and Human Services has awarded $55.5 million in grants to help bolster a health-care workforce that is stretched thin and possibly due for more strain under the Affordable Care Act. About 82 percent of the money will go toward nursing to provide low-interest educational loans, pay for advanced training and encourage racial and ethnic minorities to enter the profession. A smaller portion of the funding will help address dental-workforce needs, support residency programs in the field of preventive medicine and train doctoral-level psychologists.

Safety-Net Hospitals Lose More Under Medicare’s Quality-Based Payments, Analysis Finds
Medicare’s effort to reward hospitals for quality is leaving many of the nation’s safety-net hospitals poorer, a new analysis finds. Hospitals treating the most low-income patients on average had their payment rates reduced by 0.09 percent in the latest round of Medicare’s program that rates hospitals’ quality. In contrast, the hospitals with the fewest low-income patients received an average bonus of 0.6 percent.
 
In South Los Angeles, A Bold Plan to Address Health Disparities
The third installment of Forbes’ “Profiles in Innovation” series describes how the leader of a network of FQHCs in South Los Angeles has been tackling health disparities through the creation of “wellness trusts.”
 
Tackling a Racial Gap in Breast Cancer Survival
This article explores some of the reasons behind the widening racial divide in breast cancer survival rates.  Although breast cancer is diagnosed more frequently in white women, black women are far more likely to die of the disease.  The article includes an interactive graphic, showing state-by-state differences in mortality rates between black women and white women with breast cancer since 1975.
 
Medical Schools Expand with Little Change in Demographics
“We learned that there are a number of things we will need to address as we work to create a pipeline program,” said principal investigator Greer Glazer, PhD, University of Cincinnati College of Nursing dean in a written statement. “We need to build the confidence of students at an early age, expose them early on to the possibility of a career in healthcare, educate parents about career opportunities for their children, engage entire communities around the topic, and build--and in some cases, rebuild--trust.”
 
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has hired its first permanent associate director of data science-- a formal signal by the biomedical agency that the age of "big data" has arrived in scientific research.

 

Upcoming Events

The 2014 LGBT Health Workforce Conference will be held on May 1-3, 2014 in New York, NY.  The focus is "Engineering Institutions and Empowering Individuals to Better Serve LGBT Communities."  Although the conference is designed for health professionals, educators, and students (pre-health professions, professional schools, and graduate), all who are interested are invited to attend. CME credit will be available.
 
The AAMC will hold a webinar entitled "Charting a Course as a Clinician Investigator: Many Alternatives to the Demands of Being a PI" on Thursday, January 30, 2014, from 2:00-3:00pm EST.  A second webinar, "Navigating through the AHRQ's Career Development Opportunities, Application Preparation and Review Process,” will be held on Thursday, February 13, 2014, from 2:00-3:00pm EST

Publications and Resources

HRSA’s National Center for Health Workforce Analysis has released a new report, “Projecting the Supply and Demand for Primary Care Practitioners Through 2020.” Findings from the report include: “demand for primary care services is projected to grow, mostly due to population aging and growth; the primary care NP and PA workforces are projected to grow far more rapidly than the physician supply; and, increased use of NPs and PAs could somewhat alleviate the projected primary care physician shortage if they are effectively integrated into the health care delivery system.”
 
Numerous forecasts have predicted shortages of physicians in the United States, particularly in light of the expected increase in demand from the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  However, an analysis by the RAND Corporation suggests that several recent innovations a attempting to change the way primary care is delivered — by expanding who provides care (e.g., physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) and how care is coordinated (e.g., through teams), may reduce the severity of the shortage. 
 
A new study in JAMA Psychiatry examines the impact of insurance acceptance by psychiatrists on access to mental health care. The authors found that acceptance rates for all types of insurance were significantly lower for psychiatrists than for physicians in other specialties, and that these low rates of acceptance may pose a barrier to access to mental health services.
 
The Centers for Disease Control has issued “CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States, 2013.” This is the CDC’s second health disparities report. It provides new data for 19 of the topics published in 2011 and presents 10 new topics.

The Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) has made available a recording of their recent webinar on how a social determinants approach may be applied in practice and incorporated into education for public health to strengthen the health ecosystem. 
 
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2013-12-20T22:45:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Urban Universities for HEALTH Launches National Study on Holistic Review in the Health Professions]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/urban-universities-for-health-launches-national-study-on-holistic-review-in http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/urban-universities-for-health-launches-national-study-on-holistic-review-in#When:20:30:00Z

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Washington, DC – The Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative today launched a national study on universities’ use of holistic review as part of their admission process for students pursuing careers in the health professions. The study will examine how universities are using holistic review and other admission practices, with the goal of improving evidence in support of admission strategies that lead to a more diverse and culturally competent health workforce.

Holistic review is a flexible, individualized way of assessing how an applicant will fare as a student and as a future professional and member of society.  Under holistic review, admission committees consider a student’s life experiences and personal qualities alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores.

The practice has been used extensively among schools of medicine, where evidence in support of its success is strong. However, the practice is inconsistently applied within other health professions. According to a 2011 survey conducted by the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU), 92 percent of USU medical schools and 87.5 percent of USU dentistry schools utilize holistic review, while only 43 percent of USU nursing schools have adopted the practice.  This study hopes to find out why.

“I am delighted that Urban Universities for HEALTH has decided to invest in additional research on this topic, and that the University of Cincinnati team will be at the helm,” said Dr. Greer Glazer, dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Cincinnati (UC), who is leading the study. “Holistic review is a very promising practice, and we are hopeful that by improving evidence around holistic review we will increase universities’ capacity to move the dial on training a future health workforce that meets community needs.”

A diverse class exposes all students to the variety of cultures and perspectives they will experience as future professionals. Learning how to interact effectively with patients from different backgrounds is essential for graduates in all health fields.  Although universities pursue a variety of strategies to achieve diversity, holistic review is one strategy that shows particular promise. However, because the practice is so new there is a need to examine the evidence, and understand what outcomes are changing as a result. 

“Our universities are constantly looking for more effective, evidence-based methods of achieving the diverse body of students they seek while ensuring successful outcomes for all students,” said Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU). “Holistic review is one strategy that shows a great deal of potential, but we need to learn more, which is why this new study is so important.”

The researchers will collect both quantitative and qualitative data, surveying a broad group of health professional schools and engaging experts from the fields of medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and public health.  An analysis of key findings will be published and presented to a cohort of universities seeking to improve admission practices at their campuses.  The study will provide much-needed evidence regarding the effectiveness of holistic review, which will aid university leaders considering changes to their institutions’ admission processes.  The study is expected to conclude at the end of October 2014.

Support for the study is provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), in partnership with the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  A supplemental grant has been awarded to the AAMC and USU/APLU to fund additional research and activities associated with the study. 

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About Urban Universities for HEALTH

Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership and Transformation of the Health Workforce) is a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The project aims to address the severe shortage of qualified health professionals in underserved areas by leveraging the power of urban universities to enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse, and prepared health workforce.

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2013-12-16T20:30:00+00:00
<![CDATA[APLU Panel Highlights Expanding Role of Universities in Health of the Nation]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/aplu-panel-highlights-expanding-role-of-universities-in-health-of-the-natio http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/aplu-panel-highlights-expanding-role-of-universities-in-health-of-the-natio#When:16:16:00Z

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Washington, DC – A panel of university presidents and health care leaders urged public universities to consider the impact of national health care reform on their institutions in a session of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) Annual Meeting on Sunday, November 10. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) and other upcoming changes will affect how universities educate future health care professionals and contribute to the health of their communities.

Health of a Nation PanelSusan Dentzer, senior health policy adviser to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, set the tone for the discussion by describing the current state of health care in America. “We need three things,” said Dentzer, “better health, better health care, and we need it all to cost less.” Although no one law will serve as a panacea, the ACA aims to help the United States make progress toward these goals by emphasizing preventive care, community and population health, and payment for value, not volume.

As a result of these national reforms, health care services are moving out of the hospital and into the community, where care is increasingly delivered by interdisciplinary teams. Universities must adapt their curriculum so that students will have the opportunity to train together in the same environment where they will apply their skills. In the health care system of the future, new types of professionals such as community health workers and health coaches will collaborate with physicians to provide care and engage the community.  “We have to stop talking about primary care physicians and start talking about primary care services,” said President M. Roy Wilson of Wayne State University.

Ronald M. Berkman, president of Cleveland State University, suggested that “the ACA is as much of a paradigm change for higher education as it is for health care.”  Initiatives such as Urban Universities for HEALTH will provide universities with the opportunity to “beta-test” new innovations with communities and demonstrate through data that those interventions have been effective.

In addition to preparing students for new roles and environments, universities must also consider how they will train students to provide better quality care that will alleviate persistent health disparities. J. Nadine Gracia, deputy assistant secretary for minority health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, cited statistics demonstrating that ethnic minorities consistently receive lower quality care. “Quality care is culturally and linguistically appropriate care,” said Gracia. By eliminating these disparities, the nation would “reduce its health care expenditures by $229 billion per year.” Group Photo APLU Panel

However, the panelists acknowledged that many universities have not yet taken sufficient action in response to the larger transformation of health care.  Barriers and silos reinforced by existing accreditation systems must be broken down in order for health education to evolve. Many university leaders are focused on expanding their academic medical centers and training more specialties, rather than pumping money into primary care programs.  “You need to have university leadership on board,” said Berkman. “The CSU/NEOMED partnership and its explicit focus on primary care is a good example.”

Click here to read additional media coverage of this session

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About Urban Universities for HEALTH

Urban Universities for HEALTH (Health Equity through Alignment, Leadership and Transformation of the Health Workforce) is a partnership effort of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU)/Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The project aims to address the severe shortage of qualified health professionals in underserved areas by leveraging the power of urban universities to enhance and expand a culturally sensitive, diverse, and prepared health workforce.

 

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2013-11-15T16:16:00+00:00
<![CDATA[Join us for “The Health of a Nation: An Expanding Role for Universities”]]> http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/join-us-for-the-health-of-a-nation-an-expanding-role-for-universities http://urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org/news/join-us-for-the-health-of-a-nation-an-expanding-role-for-universities#When:19:03:00Z

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Washington, DC - Urban Universities for HEALTH is collaborating with the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) to offer a special health session at the 2013 APLU Annual Meeting, entitled "The Health of a Nation: An Expanding Role for Universities."  The session will take place from 1:45-3:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 10, at the APLU Annual Meeting (registration required), held at the Marriott Wardman Park hotel (2660 Woodley Rd NW) in Washington, DC.

This session will explore the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and accompanying transformation of the health care sector on public universities as educators of the future health workforce, stewards of academic health centers and community health, and large employers that provide health insurance to their workers. As universities adapt to these policy changes, they have an opportunity – and responsibility – to think critically about how health career fields will be affected and how institutions can respond in ways that maximize student success at both the undergraduate and professional levels and help adapt their institutions to a fundamental social change. 

Panelists will discuss how universities are preparing for the paradigm shift imposed by national health care reform and shaping the future health workforce for their communities.

Dr. Shari Garmise, Vice President of Urban Initiatives at APLU, provides a preview of the session:

For more information about this session, please contact Julia Michaels, Learning Collaborative Coordinator, at info@urbanuniversitiesforhealth.org.

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2013-10-23T19:03:00+00:00