Past Events

Webinar: Supporting Minority Postdocs

Tuesday, April 18, 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern Time

Video Recording

 

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Speakers

Background

A critical transition point for entry into the professoriate is a postdoctoral experience. In the STEM and biomedical science fields, one or more years of work as a postdoc are increasingly required for advancement into tenure-track faculty positions, but according to recent NSF data only 8.3 percent of postdoctoral scholars in those fields were from underrepresented backgrounds. Furthermore, underrepresented postdocs are not entering tenure-track faculty positions in sufficient numbers, especially at research-intensive institutions. During this webinar, we will explore known barriers to minority postdoc success as well as the efficacy of national programs designed to advance them to the professoriate (e.g. NIH IRACDA). Speakers will also highlight successful regional programs, such as the Carolina Postdoctoral Program for Faculty Diversity. The webinar will conclude with information about a proposed action item to partner with national stakeholders to evaluate the impact of diversity programs on postdoctoral scholars.

 

Webinar: Tracking Student Access to High-Impact Practices in STEM

Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern Time

Video Recording

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Speakers

Background

We know that certain “High-Impact Practices,” such as internships, undergraduate research, capstone courses, and learning communities, help undergraduate students persist and succeed. These practices have a disproportionately positive impact on students from underrepresented backgrounds. This webinar will briefly summarize the evidence for High-Impact Practices (HIPs) and share innovative efforts from California State University, Northridge and the University of South Carolina to track and analyze underrepresented student participation and outcomes.

 

Webinar: Hiring Diverse Faculty: Promising Practices

Thursday, February 2, 2017, 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern Time

Video Recording

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Speakers

Background

University leaders know that a diverse faculty body is essential to excellence in research, teaching, service, and patient care. A diverse faculty contributes to a climate of inclusion on campus and promotes research on a wide variety of topics applicable to individuals from all backgrounds. Having a diverse faculty also encourages the ascension of diverse leaders to senior administrative positions. Although universities have a vested interest in diversifying their faculty, many universities struggle to achieve diversity goals – despite their best efforts. This webinar will explore evidence-based practices for faculty hiring as well as promising practices that could benefit from further testing. The webinar hosts will also share information about an upcoming project to pilot these promising practices, with the goal of improving evidence for strategies that work.

 

Webinar: Addressing Unconscious Bias in Higher Education

Friday, January 13, 2017, 12:00-1:00 p.m. Eastern Time

Video Recording

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Speakers:

Background

Providing unconscious bias training to faculty and staff may reduce discrimination and the impact of bias at the university. Although evidence-based training models exist, effective implementation of those models is critical. Some universities have found that mandatory training can incite backlash, while voluntary training is unlikely to reach those who need it most. In addition, not all biases can be addressed at once; separate trainings are needed for racial bias, gender bias, disability bias, etc. During this webinar, experts on unconscious bias training will share evidence from their research, describe effective models, and discuss challenges for implementation. The speakers will also discuss remaining research gaps that limit the applicability of unconscious bias interventions across different contexts (e.g., admissions) and next steps for expanding the use of this promising practice.

 

Webinar: Holistic Review in Graduate Admissions - What We Need to Know

November 3, 2016,12:00-1:00 p.m. ET

Video recording

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Speakers

Background

The pathway to becoming a scientist leads through graduate school, and graduate admissions committees are the gatekeepers. How they choose to evaluate applicants to their programs impacts the development of the future research workforce. Holistic review is a university admissions strategy that assesses an applicant’s unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores. Robust evidence supports the use of holistic review in undergraduate admissions and in the health professions, but the extent to which graduate programs are using the practice – and how they are using it – is less well-known.

This webinar, co-hosted by the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS), the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), is part of a series intended to stimulate discussion and engage university leaders around topics from the recent report Increasing Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce: Actions for Improving Evidence, supported by the NIH. The webinar will explore existing evidence for the promising practice of holistic review and critical gaps in evidence that need to be addressed. Speakers will discuss the challenges associated with holistic review in graduate admissions, with a particular focus on STEM and the biomedical sciences where scholars from diverse backgrounds are underrepresented. The webinar will close with information about a proposed action item to pilot holistic review in STEM and biomedical science graduate programs.

 

Virtual Release: Improving Diversity and Institutional Climate through Faculty Cluster Hiring

April 30, 2015, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. EDT

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Speakers

Background

Many universities pursue interdisciplinary research and collaboration as strategies for addressing grand challenges facing our society. University leaders also recognize the value of diversity in higher education, as scholars from diverse backgrounds inject new perspectives into teaching, research, and service and help universities advance their missions. An inclusive campus climate that values diversity is one of the determinants of institutional excellence, and leaders seek strategies to improve the climate at their institutions. Faculty diversity and an inclusive climate are especially important in the health professions, as graduates must have the background, qualities, and skills to serve diverse patient populations and reduce health disparities. 

In this live webcast, Urban Universities for HEALTH will formally release the results from a qualitative study of faculty cluster hiring, an emerging practice in higher education that involves hiring faculty into multiple departments or colleges around interdisciplinary research topics, or “clusters.” Many cluster hiring programs also aim to increase faculty diversity or address other aspects of intellectual life at the institution, including faculty career success, collaboration across disciplines, the teaching and learning environment, and community engagement.

The report, developed by an advisory group of provosts and other faculty hiring experts at APLU/USU institutions, draws upon the experiences of 10 public universities that have developed faculty cluster hiring programs. The report will share promising practices university leaders may consider as they seek to improve diversity and climate on their campuses.

Join the conversation on Twitter at #clusterhiring.

 

Press Release: National Study on University Admissions in the Health Professions

Tuesday, September 30, 2014,9:00-10:00 a.m. EDT

Download the Report: Holistic Admissions

 

 

 

 

Speakers

Background

On September 30, 2014, in Washington, DC, the Urban Universities for HEALTH Learning Collaborative will release a report that is the first to examine nationwide the impact and use of holistic review—a university admissions process that assesses an applicant’s unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores—for students pursuing careers in the health professions.

Many colleges and universities use a holistic admission process to select students. The practice has become more popular in health fields such as medicine, because it enables schools to evaluate a broader range of criteria important for student success, and to select individuals with the background and skills needed to meet the demands of a transforming health care environment. However, the extent to which this admissions practice was being used across multiple health professions schools nationwide and the impact it’s had on academic success, diversity, and other outcomes—such as students’ engagement with the community—were largely unknown until now.

The National Study on University Admissions in the Health Professions was conducted jointly by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), and the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU), and funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

At the event, researchers and higher education leaders will discuss key findings from the study and the impact of the holistic review process.

Join the conversation on Twitter at #HolisticReview.